1. Post #201
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Standing Jujutsu is a good way to protect yourself, honestly I would rather not go to the ground on the street. You don't know how many people the guy will have with him. Sorry BJJ people.
    It's a very good point, but BJJ does teach you how to work on the ground when someone else takes you down. It's valuable to know in case you end up on your back after a cheap shot or getting tackled, but not a good way to defend against multiple opponents.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  2. Post #202
    MMASeidokan's Avatar
    March 2012
    32 Posts
    Ahh great point, if someone did bring me to the ground I would use te BJJ to snap his arm real quick and get up and continue fighting if I had to. But I would not wana be taking someone down when he is being a wuss and having his friends fight for him. Striking is definately key wether there are multiple oppenents or not. And if this man were drunk and trying to shoot reaching his wobbly arms at me, standing neck crank with the thumb pushing in between the adam's apple . Most painful way to be choked. Haha

  3. Post #203
    Gold Member
    Mr_Razzums's Avatar
    December 2005
    4,570 Posts
    Any of you guys going to NAGA in Huston Tx, Saturday?

  4. Post #204
    Gold Member
    NO ONE's Avatar
    April 2007
    3,210 Posts
    NAGA almost never comes close enough to me for me to comfortably travel there. Farthest I've gone is Portland, ME, which is about 2-2.5hrs away from me. It wasn't for NAGA though. It was for the Freestyle Grappling Open. I lost pretty badly. It's so hard for me to gauge where I'm at in BJJ. I decided to do the blue belt level because I've been working through my Karate instructor's semi-limited knowledge for the past 2.5years. I wasn't submitted EVERY match, but I still was fairly outclassed.

    I wish there were some local karate or kickboxing tournaments around where I live. It's possible I'm not looking hard enough, but for the most part all I know immediately about is the tournament my own school basically runs, which mainly consists of students from my school mixed in with people from other local schools. It's really not a great test of skill. The competitors stay pretty consistent, which is part of the problem. Plus my instructor straight out admitted it's more aimed at kids. I mean the most "alive" event we have is grappling, which I've been doing. It just makes me upset that even for the adults they still only have point sparring.

  5. Post #205
    Ryz0's Avatar
    July 2010
    4,023 Posts
    It's a very good point, but BJJ does teach you how to work on the ground when someone else takes you down. It's valuable to know in case you end up on your back after a cheap shot or getting tackled, but not a good way to defend against multiple opponents.
    Most if not all street fights get taken to the ground, ESPECIALLY when it's two untrained people fighting, untrained people tend to throw wild inaccurate punches and grapple. Hence why most street fights end up being a cuddling match on the ground

  6. Post #206
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Most if not all street fights get taken to the ground, ESPECIALLY when it's two untrained people fighting, untrained people tend to throw wild inaccurate punches and grapple. Hence why most street fights end up being a cuddling match on the ground
    yeah that was my overall point, the only street fight I've ever been in ended up with me on the ground because the guy wailed the side of my head. This was when martial arts to me was just an interest, not something I trained for.

  7. Post #207
    I bought this title for 1 dollar
    titopei's Avatar
    April 2009
    8,518 Posts
    Would Krav Maga be worth it if I find a real trainer (Not like the ones that just sell black belts after a year of training in martial arts)

  8. Post #208
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Would Krav Maga be worth it if I find a real trainer (Not like the ones that just sell black belts after a year of training in martial arts)
    Well what are you looking for? I'm assuming that since you want krav you're looking to defend yourself? Krav would be good for that, but be warned: KM's conditioning is brutal. Absolutely brutal. Also it is one of the largest sufferers of McDojoism. If this would be your first time taking a martial art, don't go for krav.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 2 (list)

  9. Post #209
    WuWei's Avatar
    January 2010
    365 Posts
    What do you mean by conditioning ? Is there anything special in terms of Krav Maga?

  10. Post #210
    I bought this title for 1 dollar
    titopei's Avatar
    April 2009
    8,518 Posts
    Well what are you looking for? I'm assuming that since you want krav you're looking to defend yourself? Krav would be good for that, but be warned: KM's conditioning is brutal. Absolutely brutal. Also it is one of the largest sufferers of McDojoism. If this would be your first time taking a martial art, don't go for krav.

    I used to do boxing but then I stopped after 2 years. I might start some form of martial arts later on. What is a good one for self defense? I'm not really into competitive fighting but just more of self defense.
    Edited:

    tl;dr I'm not too into competitive fighting but I would like to do a martial art preferably for defense.

  11. Post #211
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    What do you mean by conditioning ? Is there anything special in terms of Krav Maga?
    if he is going to a reputable school, when they are tested the tests for levels involve very long sessions of sparring and whatnot iirc


    also man, if you can handle it, go for krav. check the school out first on bullshido.net before you lay any money down though

  12. Post #212
    zacht_180's Avatar
    May 2010
    702 Posts
    I'm going to get into a martial-art this summer after spring sports and whatnot.

    I've been doing a lot of research, and I'm pretty interested in Aikijutsu or Aikido. Personally I think it'd be neat to learn a lot of techniques involving joint-locks, arms restraints, submission, etc... I think I'd enjoy it more than kicks and punches. Also considering I work with cops all the time. Would it be something worth learning, something that could easily be applied in a real confrontation? Anyone have any input?

  13. Post #213
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    I'm going to get into a martial-art this summer after spring sports and whatnot.

    I've been doing a lot of research, and I'm pretty interested in Aikijutsu or Aikido. Personally I think it'd be neat to learn a lot of techniques involving joint-locks, arms restraints, submission, etc... I think I'd enjoy it more than kicks and punches. Also considering I work with cops all the time. Would it be something worth learning, something that could easily be applied in a real confrontation? Anyone have any input?
    Don't sign up for a school according to what you think you would like. I always thought I would hate striking and never be able to take a punch, but now my style gravitates toward aggressive muay thai tactic and clinch fighting. If you want to learn submissions, I'd say go for brazillian jiu jitsu. Just from personal experience, I don't know a goddamned thing about Aikido and I've never heard of Aikijutsu. Beware of McDojos.

    also if you want real life application, in my opinion you should cross train in several different arts. It is the best way to prepare for an attack. I have a friend that practices Jeet Kune Do and Krav Maga chiefly with others on the side, it's saved his life many many times.

  14. Post #214
    zacht_180's Avatar
    May 2010
    702 Posts
    Don't sign up for a school according to what you think you would like. I always thought I would hate striking and never be able to take a punch, but now my style gravitates toward aggressive muay thai tactic and clinch fighting. If you want to learn submissions, I'd say go for brazillian jiu jitsu. Just from personal experience, I don't know a goddamned thing about Aikido and I've never heard of Aikijutsu. Beware of McDojos.

    also if you want real life application, in my opinion you should cross train in several different arts. It is the best way to prepare for an attack. I have a friend that practices Jeet Kune Do and Krav Maga chiefly with others on the side, it's saved his life many many times.

    Yeah, Aikijutsu/Aiki is suppose to be pretty similar to jujitsu. And yeah, the dojo I'm looking at is highly respected. Others in my family use it for Karate, Kenjutsu, and Aikido. It's been around for quite a while and has a great reputation. I'm 100% certain it's not a McDojo.

    In my opinion (and experience) it's just best to go with what interests you most. If you don't care for the sport of football, why the hell would you try out for it? I'll also look into cross-training. Thanks dude!

  15. Post #215
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Yeah, Aikijutsu/Aiki is suppose to be pretty similar to jujitsu. And yeah, the dojo I'm looking at is highly respected. Others in my family use it for Karate, Kenjutsu, and Aikido. It's been around for quite a while and has a great reputation. I'm 100% certain it's not a McDojo.

    In my opinion (and experience) it's just best to go with what interests you most. If you don't care for the sport of football, why the hell would you try out for it? I'll also look into cross-training. Thanks dude!
    In my honest opinion, try kickboxing or something too, you never know what you might miss out on. My only advice is be careful trying to get some of the wristlocks and other techniques used in Aiki. I would honestly recommend a Jeet Kune Do base with elements from Aiki if that's what you're into. And no problem man.

  16. Post #216
    Gold Member
    Mr_Razzums's Avatar
    December 2005
    4,570 Posts
    Yeah, Aikijutsu/Aiki is suppose to be pretty similar to jujitsu. And yeah, the dojo I'm looking at is highly respected. Others in my family use it for Karate, Kenjutsu, and Aikido. It's been around for quite a while and has a great reputation. I'm 100% certain it's not a McDojo.

    In my opinion (and experience) it's just best to go with what interests you most. If you don't care for the sport of football, why the hell would you try out for it? I'll also look into cross-training. Thanks dude!
    Ha, just because your family go to it and they teach karate, kenjutsu, aikido, tkd etc. doesn't mean its exempt from being a mcdojo. If anything, the fact that they teach aikido and karate makes it seem even more like a mcdojo.

    Edited:


    Please watch this video before choosing an art.

       if you dont get my point... choose wrestling(or judo), striking(muay thai/boxing) or bjj. Choose one of those or you're wasting your time.   
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Dumb Dumb x 1Informative Informative x 1 (list)

  17. Post #217
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Ha, just because your family go to it and they teach karate, kenjutsu, aikido, tkd etc. doesn't mean its exempt from being a mcdojo. If anything, the fact that they teach aikido and karate makes it seem even more like a mcdojo.

    Edited:


    Please watch this video before choosing an art.

       if you dont get my point... choose wrestling(or judo), striking(muay thai/boxing) or bjj. Choose one of those or you're wasting your time.   
    I mostly agree, but you can find good schools for more obscure or ancient arts, only problem is that they are few and far between, sometimes even in their country of origin. You should choose a more modern art imo because it'll likely be built around modern world challenges. Example being for self defense if you have a good Aikido school and a good Krav Maga school obviously learn Krav, but in reality I doubt you'll find a genuine school for it here.

  18. Post #218
    zacht_180's Avatar
    May 2010
    702 Posts
    I'm almost certain it's not, and I didn't say it was exempt. I'm clearly no expert, but here.

    http://www.ohiobudokan.org/

    I mean, they're non-profit, they don't steal your money, and they teach authentic technique and discipline.

  19. Post #219
    Gold Member
    blacksam's Avatar
    July 2007
    2,295 Posts
    I'm almost certain it's not, and I didn't say it was exempt. I'm clearly no expert, but here.

    http://www.ohiobudokan.org/

    I mean, they're non-profit, they don't steal your money, and they teach authentic technique and discipline.
    Whoa, a fellow ohio facepuncher. In the dayton area. Jesus. Small world.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  20. Post #220
    ImTerryCrews's Avatar
    January 2012
    289 Posts
    2nd worst state, 100% ghetto
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 2 (list)

  21. Post #221
    zacht_180's Avatar
    May 2010
    702 Posts
    Whoa, a fellow ohio facepuncher. In the dayton area. Jesus. Small world.
    Haha, that's awesome man. I grew up around here and love it.
    and LOL Terry. Stay out of Dayton, Cincinnati, Cleveland and you'll be fine. Everything else is decent or farmers.


    Anyways back to the topic...

  22. Post #222
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Friend from richmond came down for some sparring this weekend. We did mostly kickboxing and thai boxing with grappling. I have some micro fractures on my shins because we don't use shin guards. i usually just wait until the pain and sensitivity die down before I spar again but I don't know if I'm damaging my legs or what?

    I am making good strides in form and in technique but there is one thing I need advice on. When we do full contact sparring with face shots allowed, I develop a kind of flinch once we get into some tighter up close striking. Is there any kind of drill that would help me kill this before it becomes a problem?

  23. Post #223
    wallyroberto_2's Avatar
    August 2011
    2,308 Posts
    My friends and I who go to TKD are all sore from doing sparring to practice for an upcoming WTF rules tournament. I really need to learn to control my steps better when I'm moving out of the way of kicks, I usually overshoot and don't have a good position for a counterkick because I am too far away.

  24. Post #224
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    My friends and I who go to TKD are all sore from doing sparring to practice for an upcoming WTF rules tournament. I really need to learn to control my steps better when I'm moving out of the way of kicks, I usually overshoot and don't have a good position for a counterkick because I am too far away.
    do you do any footwork drills? I always work on my stance and footwork. work it into your shadowboxing.

  25. Post #225
    wallyroberto_2's Avatar
    August 2011
    2,308 Posts
    Yeah, we do partner drills and things like that, I just need to practice more, Thanks.

  26. Post #226
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Yeah, we do partner drills and things like that, I just need to practice more, Thanks.
    no problem. you drill at home outside the dojo too right?

  27. Post #227
    Gold Member
    NO ONE's Avatar
    April 2007
    3,210 Posts
    Friend from richmond came down for some sparring this weekend. We did mostly kickboxing and thai boxing with grappling. I have some micro fractures on my shins because we don't use shin guards. i usually just wait until the pain and sensitivity die down before I spar again but I don't know if I'm damaging my legs or what?
    The whole concept of conditioning is to pretty much get those micro fractures. The bone heals by filling in the fractures, thus becoming thicker and stronger. Some days conditioning will hurt more than others, but just realize that it helps in the long run. Also realize there is a difference to being "hurt" and being HURT.

  28. Post #228
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    The whole concept of conditioning is to pretty much get those micro fractures. The bone heals by filling in the fractures, thus becoming thicker and stronger. Some days conditioning will hurt more than others, but just realize that it helps in the long run. Also realize there is a difference to being "hurt" and being HURT.
    Sunday I was hurting pretty bad but the bruising has died down so I must not have really fucked them up. It doesn't hurt like shin splints from running, it's just reaaaally sensitive to any touch. but they are getting tougher, that's for damn sure; going shin to shin by accident is not as bad anymore

  29. Post #229
    Dennab
    January 2012
    609 Posts
    Sunday I was hurting pretty bad but the bruising has died down so I must not have really fucked them up. It doesn't hurt like shin splints from running, it's just reaaaally sensitive to any touch. but they are getting tougher, that's for damn sure; going shin to shin by accident is not as bad anymore
    Sometimes it can be difficult to determine how damaged your shins are because both your nerves and bones have to be conditioned. Most of the time, it's the nerves freaking out while the bones are fine.

    If it's sensitive to the touch, it's probably just the nerves going haywire. Microfractures will temporarily weaken the bone, and enough of them will leave it sore and throbbing, but still won't make it painful to light touches.

    A lot of guys will tell you to take a rolling pin and roll it down your shins to pop the nerves. Don't do that, you need them to tell you how injured you are. Popping the nerves without conditioning the bone is like taking the batteries out of a smoke alarm.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  30. Post #230
    Teal Moose's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,667 Posts
    Sometimes it can be difficult to determine how damaged your shins are because both your nerves and bones have to be conditioned. Most of the time, it's the nerves freaking out while the bones are fine.

    If it's sensitive to the touch, it's probably just the nerves going haywire. Microfractures will temporarily weaken the bone, and enough of them will leave it sore and throbbing, but still won't make it painful to light touches.

    A lot of guys will tell you to take a rolling pin and roll it down your shins to pop the nerves. Don't do that, you need them to tell you how injured you are. Popping the nerves without conditioning the bone is like taking the batteries out of a smoke alarm.
    I haven't tried anything gimmicky like that, I just rely on sparring to toughen them up. My guys and I used a lot of leg kicks which means going tibia to tibia sometimes, so that conditions them up enough I believe.

  31. Post #231
    Behemoth_PT's Avatar
    March 2007
    1,946 Posts
    if he is going to a reputable school, when they are tested the tests for levels involve very long sessions of sparring and whatnot iirc





    also man, if you can handle it, go for krav. check the school out first on bullshido.net before you lay any money down though
    I'm practicing Krav Maga with EFKM developed by Richard Douieb and I find that video to be one of the perfect examples of MacDojoism.

    Those techniques are poorly interpreted and are using lots of flaws. Most of them don't work. That is not Krav Maga, mate. That's just some kick ass, ninja style combination of moves from lots of martial arts. You got Judo there, some karate, kick boxing, nothing that says it's real krav maga.

    That's the problem. The problem of every MacDojo and every pseudo-federation: They want to make us believe Krav Maga to be a Deadly Van Dame style kick ass martial arts combination.

    It's not, ok?

    Krav Maga has a belt system and the training is hard but the progress is very slow in order for you to absorb the motion and learn your body to react instantly to threat.

    If I show you videos of Krav Maga practising of first level it will look like the lamest thing you've ever seen. Yes, the first days in Krav Maga, are lame, slow and boring sometimes followed by intense military exercise to build up your body, agility and flexibility. You have to be patient and learn slowly so you don't end up stabbed or shot over you excessive self confidence in a technique you can barely dominate.

    This is a really Krav Maga Training (civilian level) without that marketing and appealing bullshit you see in videos:

    And this is some of the extreme of Krav Maga. Most of these techniques are not available for civilians since they are military level:

  32. Post #232
    Star Extraordinaire
    Blazyd's Avatar
    May 2011
    4,479 Posts
    I've been doing Tae Kwon Do for about 2 years now, and I'm at the 1st level of brown belt.

    I never had to use it in a real life situation, but I'm prepared to.

  33. Post #233
    Gold Member
    Mr_Razzums's Avatar
    December 2005
    4,570 Posts
    I've been doing Tae Kwon Do for about 2 years now, and I'm at the 1st level of brown belt.

    I never had to use it in a real life situation, but I'm prepared to.
    oh boy
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 2Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  34. Post #234
    Behemoth_PT's Avatar
    March 2007
    1,946 Posts
    I've been doing Tae Kwon Do for about 2 years now, and I'm at the 1st level of brown belt.

    I never had to use it in a real life situation, but I'm prepared to.
    Can you keep calm in a life threatening situation? Have you ever been in one? If not, then you're not prepared.

    Trust me. There's a line that separates martial artas from self defence. And most of the times self defence is all about running to the hills.

    I've been in both situations. First time I had to give my money to the robber because I was inside a moving metro with nowhere to run and 2 knives pointed at both my neck and belly.

    Secound time I was able to punch and kick my way out of there. It was harder that I thought. First because your adrenaline starts pumping and it will be difficult to controll your breathing. You'll do everything by impulse and have a hard time trying to keep calm, so you'll make lots of basic mistakes that can cost you.

    Sometimes self defense requires (in an extreme situation) you too keep fighting even if you're stabbed.

    It's not the walk in the park you see inside the dojo or the ring. It's actually totally different. Fighting with cooperating personel and fighting in a ring with rules teaches you how to fight, but it never prepares you the demands of street fighting.

  35. Post #235
    Gold Member
    Mr_Razzums's Avatar
    December 2005
    4,570 Posts
    Can you keep calm in a life threatening situation? Have you ever been in one? If not, then you're not prepared.

    Trust me. There's a line that separates martial artas from self defence. And most of the times self defence is all about running to the hills.

    I've been in both situations. First time I had to give my money to the robber because I was inside a moving metro with nowhere to run and 2 knives pointed at both my neck and belly.

    Secound time I was able to punch and kick my way out of there. It was harder that I thought. First because your adrenaline starts pumping and it will be difficult to controll your breathing. You'll do everything by impulse and have a hard time trying to keep calm, so you'll make lots of basic mistakes that can cost you.

    Sometimes self defense requires (in an extreme situation) you too keep fighting even if you're stabbed.

    It's not the walk in the park you see inside the dojo or the ring. It's actually totally different. Fighting with cooperating personel and fighting in a ring with rules teaches you how to fight, but it never prepares you the demands of street fighting.

    Too often do people leave the dojo thinking they can handle self-defense situations. This is way more true for no-contact, light contact, and mcdojo martial arts. You can drill and "light contact spar" all you want, but until someone is trying to kill you, or put you in the hospital, you will never know if you are "prepared" to fight in a real life situation.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 2 (list)

  36. Post #236
    WuWei's Avatar
    January 2010
    365 Posts
    The very point of martial arts is to defend yourself, at least in the beginning. Now you've got McDojo-ism and assorted flowery bullshit.. but please don't lump everything together. There are still some places where you can learn worthwhile traditional martial arts.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista Germany Show Events Disagree Disagree x 1Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  37. Post #237
    Gold Member
    Mr_Razzums's Avatar
    December 2005
    4,570 Posts
    The very point of martial arts is to defend yourself, at least in the beginning. Now you've got McDojo-ism and assorted flowery bullshit.. but please don't lump everything together. There are still some places where you can learn worthwhile traditional martial arts.
    If you don't fight effectively against live opponents then you WILL NOT be able to defend yourself. No matter how many drills you do on defenseless/ complying targets.

  38. Post #238
    WuWei's Avatar
    January 2010
    365 Posts
    Yeah, that's not what I said. In a school worth a damn you still put your gloves on and fight.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista Germany Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  39. Post #239
    Captain Armed Dildo, Master of Ratings
    cpt.armadillo's Avatar
    February 2011
    5,541 Posts
    Back to my classes after a break from stupid aches and ankle. I felt out of shape, but was clear that I've still got it.
    My dojo is an Olympic level gym with lots of stuff for us to use. I'm just a blue belt. Broke the training boards today, wood getting expensive.

  40. Post #240
    Felipe's Avatar
    October 2011
    83 Posts
    I've done MMA and BJJ when I was younger. I want to pick up a martial art mainly for fitness and just general self defense, because why not?


    What would you guys recommend?