1. Post #361
    q3k
    Gold Member
    q3k's Avatar
    October 2009
    921 Posts
    You can use the launchpad to program the entire 4x series which goes up to 120kb of flash and 8kb of ram.
    Yes, but we're talking about the chips included in the launchpad - you can as well buy an ATMega168 for $5 and use a parallel port programmer.

    I would personally not touch the Arduino, firstly because it is very slow due due to bloated libraries
    There's an overhead when booting the Arduino, but afterwards you're running native code, and you can make it as fast as you want. Want faster IO? #include <avr.h> and use memmapped IO. Want a faster LCD/servo/whatever library? Write your own, you'd do that with an MSP430 anyway.

    and secondly the cost.
    Arduino is not only about the official arduino.cc boards (which I wouldn't touch, either). There are tons of clones, ranging from $5. Not to mention you can easily build an Arduino environment with a PDIP ATMega and a RS232 converter out of a bunch of transistors or a PDIP MAX232. It's entirely feasible, even for a beginner.
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  2. Post #362
    Gold Member
    ddrl46's Avatar
    October 2007
    3,682 Posts
    Yes, but we're talking about the chips included in the launchpad - you can as well buy an ATMega168 for $5 and use a parallel port programmer.


    There's an overhead when booting the Arduino, but afterwards you're running native code, and you can make it as fast as you want. Want faster IO? #include <avr.h> and use memmapped IO. Want a faster LCD/servo/whatever library? Write your own, you'd do that with an MSP430 anyway.


    Arduino is not only about the official arduino.cc boards (which I wouldn't touch, either). There are tons of clones, ranging from $5. Not to mention you can easily build an Arduino environment with a PDIP ATMega and a RS232 converter out of a bunch of transistors or a PDIP MAX232. It's entirely feasible, even for a beginner.
    If you are going to use it just like a normal AVR, what's the point of buying the Arduino?
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  3. Post #363
    SteamDB
    Marlamin's Avatar
    November 2007
    10,936 Posts
    Ordered a Arduino starter kit to see if I can make some fun stuff with that alone. I can always expand!

    Also saw some really awesome stuff on YouTube done with the Google Open Accessory Interface, if/when I ever get advanced enough to fiddle with that I'll be sure to make some neat stuff. (I think I have a toy Dalek around here somewhere. )
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  4. Post #364
    Gold Member

    March 2005
    3,028 Posts
    I'd go for the AVR if only for the well-supported FOSS toolchain. I think software is one place where the TI launchpads can't even hope to touch AVRs.
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  5. Post #365
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    For starting out, the Arduino isn't a bad choice.

    Starting out with AVRs could be a bit tough, especially with no prior programming knowledge.
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  6. Post #366
    Follow me on github!
    benjojo's Avatar
    January 2009
    2,620 Posts
    If starting from ground zero then I would recommend something really basic, PICAXE or Arduino. PICAXE has a basic syntax, makes sense. For example I wrote a PICAXE program when I was 8, its a nice language.
    I then moved to the arduino because of the huge community behind it.
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  7. Post #367
    Gold Member

    March 2005
    3,028 Posts
    For starting out, the Arduino isn't a bad choice.

    Starting out with AVRs could be a bit tough, especially with no prior programming knowledge.
    Same shit.

    The Arduino is just a fancy IDE and bootloader for the same chip, and the whole mess uses the same exact same toolchain. So when I say "AVR is awesome", Arduino is generally awesome by extension.
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  8. Post #368
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Same shit.

    The Arduino is just a fancy IDE and bootloader for the same chip, and the whole mess uses the same exact same toolchain. So when I say "AVR is awesome", Arduino is generally awesome by extension.
    You should take a look into the sourcecode sometime, it's a bit messy here and there. (everywhere)
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  9. Post #369
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,441 Posts

    Awesome!
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  10. Post #370
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    He should've increased the voltage until it burst into flames, just like that vacuum cleaner

    Edited:

    Also, look what someone made:



    http://hackaday.com/2011/09/09/progr...8Hack+a+Day%29


    It basically let's you convert an arduino sketch into a soundfile and program it with that.
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  11. Post #371
    Gold Member
    bobthe2lol's Avatar
    July 2007
    1,370 Posts
    I need some help. I ordered a Usbasp for my arduino which I somehow bricked. The problem is that the wire from the programmer has 2x5 pins. The arduino only has 2x3 pins. What do I do?
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  12. Post #372
    Gold Member
    ddrl46's Avatar
    October 2007
    3,682 Posts
    You can make an adapter.
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  13. Post #373
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    You can buy adapter cables aswell, or make your own out of shrouded headers. Sparkfun for example is selling these. Also ebay.
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  14. Post #374
    Gold Member
    bobthe2lol's Avatar
    July 2007
    1,370 Posts
    I figured I would ask here as well. I am having problems re-burning the bootloader on my arduino with an atmega328p. What I did (being the impatent cheapskate I am) was I soldiered some wires to the underside of the ISCP pins on the arduino. I then plugged them (correctly) into the corresponding pins on the 2x5 cable. When I plug it in (the programmer into the usb port that is) it lights up yellow, and the ON light goes on on the arduino. Using the arduino IDE I try to burn the bootloader. It tells me the board does not respond

    Code:
    avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00
    I tried another program called eXtreme burner recomended by the site that hosts the drivers for UsbASP. It manages to get some lights to flash (a green one on the usb piece and the 'L' led on the arduino) but it errors saying

    Code:
    Power on failed...
    Cannot communicate with target chip!
    What do I do?

    (chip is used (as opposed to new))
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  15. Post #375
    Gold Member
    ddrl46's Avatar
    October 2007
    3,682 Posts
    I figured I would ask here as well. I am having problems re-burning the bootloader on my arduino with an atmega328p. What I did (being the impatent cheapskate I am) was I soldiered some wires to the underside of the ISCP pins on the arduino. I then plugged them (correctly) into the corresponding pins on the 2x5 cable. When I plug it in (the programmer into the usb port that is) it lights up yellow, and the ON light goes on on the arduino. Using the arduino IDE I try to burn the bootloader. It tells me the board does not respond

    Code:
    avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00
    I tried another program called eXtreme burner recomended by the site that hosts the drivers for UsbASP. It manages to get some lights to flash (a green one on the usb piece and the 'L' led on the arduino) but it errors saying

    Code:
    Power on failed...
    Cannot communicate with target chip!
    What do I do?

    (chip is used (as opposed to new))
    If you are sure everything is connected properly it could be that the chip has the incorrect fusebits or has the lockbits set.
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  16. Post #376
    Gold Member
    bobthe2lol's Avatar
    July 2007
    1,370 Posts
    If you are sure everything is connected properly it could be that the chip has the incorrect fusebits or has the lockbits set.
    How does one remedy this?

    Also, another question. Are there things like breadboards (as in, have connected rows) but that you can solder to?
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  17. Post #377
    Gold Member
    ddrl46's Avatar
    October 2007
    3,682 Posts
    How does one remedy this?

    Also, another question. Are there things like breadboards (as in, have connected rows) but that you can solder to?
    Yes, it's called veroboard / padboard / protoyping board.
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  18. Post #378
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    So, with pcb-pool.com, you can get 100 pcbs, 10mm x 10mm for 44€ + shipping. That's pretty interesting!
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  19. Post #379
    Gold Member
    Xera's Avatar
    November 2006
    3,097 Posts
    What are you going to fit on a 10mm^2 board?
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  20. Post #380
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    What are you going to fit on a 10mm^2 board?
    You can fit a lot of stuff on such a small pcb. An arduino clone, a simple power supply, you name it.
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  21. Post #381
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,441 Posts
    You can fit a lot of stuff on such a small pcb. An arduino clone, a simple power supply, you name it.
    You've gotta be joking, firstly 44 euro is fucking expensive you can easily get much cheaper and bigger boards from china, secondly who the hell needs 100 boards.
    You don't seem to understand how small 1x1cm is, you would never be able fit an arduino clone or anything of real use on it.

    If you want a PCB the only real option is to do it yourself unless you happen to be rich or are doing a large batch.
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  22. Post #382
    Gold Member
    Xera's Avatar
    November 2006
    3,097 Posts
    You've gotta be joking, firstly 44 euro is fucking expensive you can easily get much cheaper and bigger boards from china, secondly who the hell needs 100 boards.
    You don't seem to understand how small 1x1cm is, you would never be able fit an arduino clone or anything of real use on it.

    If you want a PCB the only real option is to do it yourself unless you happen to be rich or are doing a large batch.
    There's always batchpcb.
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  23. Post #383
    Gold Member
    Lapsus's Avatar
    June 2006
    1,077 Posts
    You can fit a lot of stuff on such a small pcb. An arduino clone, a simple power supply, you name it.
    I dunno, the smallest Arduino clone is still 20.7x15.2mm. You might be able to do nothing but break out the pins on a 1x1cm board, but that's not overly useful. [The picture is a link, click it!]

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  24. Post #384
    Gold Member
    Zero-Point's Avatar
    March 2006
    7,482 Posts
    I dunno, the smallest Arduino clone is still 20.7x15.2mm. You might be able to do nothing but break out the pins on a 1x1cm board, but that's not overly useful. [The picture is a link, click it!]

    It'd be like a fucking contact lens at that point.
    "OH FUCK! Nobody move! I dropped my 'duino!"
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  25. Post #385
    Gold Member
    FoohyAB's Avatar
    July 2009
    945 Posts
    I'd just gotten a ethernet shield for my birthday and I just remembered I only had only ethernet cord to my room. Dangit. I'll have to figure something out.
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  26. Post #386
    Gold Member
    Lapsus's Avatar
    June 2006
    1,077 Posts
    It'd be like a fucking contact lens at that point.
    "OH FUCK! Nobody move! I dropped my 'duino!"
    Perfect for a UAV, or anything else where size is a concern though.
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  27. Post #387
    Follow me on github!
    benjojo's Avatar
    January 2009
    2,620 Posts
    I'd just gotten a ethernet shield for my birthday and I just remembered I only had only ethernet cord to my room. Dangit. I'll have to figure something out.
    If you want to put it anywhere you wan then buys cheap router on eBay and find a way to set up bridging that's how I do my projects wirelessly.
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  28. Post #388
    I bought a title for $1.
    sambooo's Avatar
    March 2011
    2,994 Posts
    It'd be like a fucking contact lens at that point.
    "OH FUCK! Nobody move! I dropped my 'duino!"
    You're calling it a Duino because you couldn't get all of the letters on, right?
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  29. Post #389
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts


    I decided to continue with the creation of my own psu! Today I added the switches you can see.

    The top row are On-Off-On switches for selecting power output and which voltage to display on the voltmeter, and the bottom row is an On-On switch for selecting input polarity (a protective diode is of course included)
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  30. Post #390
    Gold Member
    Xera's Avatar
    November 2006
    3,097 Posts


    I decided to continue with the creation of my own psu! Today I added the switches you can see.

    The top row are On-Off-On switches for selecting power output and which voltage to display on the voltmeter, and the bottom row is an On-On switch for selecting input polarity (a protective diode is of course included)
    Why not just build a diode bridge instead of using a switch to select polarity?
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  31. Post #391
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Why not just build a diode bridge instead of using a switch to select polarity?
    Less voltage drop, also it's a good reason to add another switch (did I already mention that they're aweome?)
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  32. Post #392
    Gold Member
    marcin1337's Avatar
    May 2006
    893 Posts
    I'm going to make a wireless power prototype sorta like this.


    I was wondering whats the difference between using a sine wave for this and a square wave?

    I would really want to use a square wave because how easy it is to make , but maybe sine wave is more efficient?
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  33. Post #393
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Hotlinking that image is not allowed.
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  34. Post #394
    Gold Member
    Zero-Point's Avatar
    March 2006
    7,482 Posts
    You're calling it a Duino because you couldn't get all of the letters on, right?
    I'll be what I wanna do.

    Also I am now in possession of a thermoelectric module, and I have no idea what to do with it. :saddowns:
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  35. Post #395
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    1 MOSFET and 2 voltage Regulators!

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  36. Post #396
    Gold Member
    Lt_C's Avatar
    March 2007
    3,103 Posts
    Ok, I'm in a design class an we were issued auduino due's for our base project. We'll be interfacing it to LCD displays and stepper motors for the class, and I have to come up with an idea for a term project using the device as well as a selection of external sensor chips and devices. I have a few ideas milling about in my mind but any suggestions for a fun and interesting project are welcome.
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  37. Post #397
    Gold Member
    Elspin's Avatar
    December 2006
    5,427 Posts
    I had a chat with some of the lab advisors and I managed to get ActiveRobotics off of them... the result: controlling a CRS-F3 robot arm with an xbox controller. I'll probably have a video soon, the movements aren't that smooth yet but it's fun to play with.

    The Arm:


    Also, does anyone know of any good indoor positioning systems? The only ones I was able to find were Active Bat and Cricket, and both of those are harder to get than the holy grail.
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  38. Post #398
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Screw perfboards! Freeform soldering is the way to go!

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  39. Post #399
    BRadNowacki's Avatar
    July 2009
    247 Posts
    ok i have an UNO board, and im looking to get into some more advanced stuff, what is this AVR i keep seeing people post about and were would i start with one?
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  40. Post #400
    Gold Member
    Elspin's Avatar
    December 2006
    5,427 Posts
    ok i have an UNO board, and im looking to get into some more advanced stuff, what is this AVR i keep seeing people post about and were would i start with one?
    You shouldn't use something more complicated just for the sake of it being more complicated. Realistically unless you have a really good understanding of how the C language works at the core, you're only going to be way MORE limited when you attempt to jump into manually programming the chip in assembly. If something is simpler and can do what you want to do it makes a lot more sense to use that.
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