1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Silikone's Avatar
    September 2006
    1,359 Posts
    Increasingly more evidence points us towards a huge ocean under Europa, Jupiter's moon. The first sign of water tells us that the moon is capable of hosting life. One theory states that Jupiter's strong gravity constantly stretches the moon, creating heat from the kinetic energy. Europa's thick layer of ice makes it a hard task for a probe to get anywhere near the target.
    What are your opinions?
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  2. Post #2
    Very likely
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  3. Post #3
    No. It is too far from sun to be good habitat for life.
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  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    erazor's Avatar
    February 2006
    1,264 Posts
    I want to believe, although I think it's incredibly unlikely.
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  5. Post #5
    Head Poster
    Sir Colton's Avatar
    April 2009
    1,763 Posts
    Very unlikely.
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  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    Loures's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,153 Posts
    No. It is too far from sun to be good habitat for life.
    This, way too cold to live on its surface.
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  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    rosthouse's Avatar
    November 2007
    6,641 Posts
    I think, other than earth, Europa is the best place to look for life.

    Although I'm quite sure that there's no life form on Europa that could talk with us

    Edited:

    This, way too cold to live on its surface.
    If there's life on Europa, we'd find it in its oceans, not on the surface.
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  8. Post #8
    I think, other than earth, Europa is the best place to look for life.

    Although I'm quite sure that there's no life form on Europa that could talk with us

    Edited:



    If there's life on Europa, we'd find it in its oceans, not on the surface.
    Ocean is also too cold. And there is no air on atmosphere, so there won't air in the water too.
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  9. Post #9
    CatFodder's Avatar
    August 2010
    1,027 Posts
    Ocean is also too cold. And there is no air on atmosphere, so there won't air in the water too.
    If there was life on Europa it wouldn't need oxygen, it would have evolved a different system.
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  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    VistaPOWA's Avatar
    October 2008
    8,370 Posts
    Ocean is also too cold. And there is no air on atmosphere, so there won't air in the water too.
    Scientists have found arsenic-based lifeforms in volcanic lakes, there is no reason why there couldn't be some kind of nitrogen/methane-based lifeforms on Europa, which wouldn't require O2 to live.
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  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    rosthouse's Avatar
    November 2007
    6,641 Posts
    Ocean is also too cold. And there is no air on atmosphere, so there won't air in the water too.
    If the water is fluid, you can expect it to be at least 0° Celsius. And we know of life forms here on earth that live in such an environment.

    Also, although you said air, I'm pretty sure you meant oxygen.
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  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    Craigewan's Avatar
    October 2005
    3,943 Posts
    If the water is fluid, you can expect it to be at least 0° Celsius. And we know of life forms here on earth that live in such an environment.

    Also, although you said air, I'm pretty sure you meant oxygen.
    You're forgetting to account for pressure.

    But yeah, we get extremophiles here on Earth, no reason why life wouldn't evolve that way from the get-go in an extreme environment.
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  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    wraithcat's Avatar
    December 2007
    12,889 Posts
    No. It is too far from sun to be good habitat for life.
    Could be based on chemosynthesis as opposed to photosynthesis. Like you know, countless bacteria present on earth in areas where there's no sun at all.
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  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    papaya's Avatar
    June 2010
    6,794 Posts
    I think if there was going to be life anywhere in our solar system that wasn't earth, it would be on Europa. Even if that was past tense, and it had all died out, to know that we as humans aren't just an anomaly would be fascinating and a little comforting.
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  15. Post #15
    sdwise's Avatar
    July 2009
    2,263 Posts


    Obviously.

    But no, I think It's too far from the sun. Maybe extremeophile bacteria, but not intelligent life.
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  16. Post #16
    Antdawg's Avatar
    July 2010
    5,124 Posts
    Why are you asking Facepunch? We aren't scientists, so how do our opinions (with none or little facts to back them up) hold any ground?
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  17. Post #17
    To be honest, a lot of the debate threads should be left to Stephen Hawking and other great minds, not for a bunch of extreme liberal teenagers with barely a high school education to debate. We don't know crap.

    So I will say this in response to the thread,
    I would hope so but I think scientists are more interested in finding it on Mars.
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  18. Post #18
    OvB
    Facepunch resident scientist
    OvB's Avatar
    March 2007
    13,087 Posts
    If there is life it's chemosynthetic extremeophiles feeding off the hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor because photosynthesis would be impossible due to the ice and distance from the sun. For that the planet would need to be geologically active. The ocean there has the potential to be incredibility deep. Something like 20 kilometers. (earths ocean is only 7 miles at its deepest point). Pressure there would be incredible. Europa is a very young rock and I'm not sure if it has undergone the necessary processes to develop primitive cells, whatever that may be. We won't know unless we go.
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  19. Post #19
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    It's very possible because the "Push and Pull" gravitational effects from jupiter cause the inner moon to heat, possibly creating heat vents and being volcanicically active.
    Microbes, and aquatic life like eels or such could be alive down there.
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  20. Post #20
    timmyvos's Avatar
    August 2011
    501 Posts
    ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS EXCEPT EUROPA. ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE.
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  21. Post #21
    Krinkels's Avatar
    March 2011
    3,546 Posts
    Jupiter's tidal effects heat the moon to the point that the oceans could sustain life. Temperature is not an issue. The radiation emitted by Jupiter, however, is lethal on Europa, which doesn't have a thick enough atmosphere to absorb the rays either. I haven't come across any life with such a high tolerance to radiation. There also isn't enough light under the ice to support photosynthesis, so plant life is impossible, and a food web with complex, multicellular life could not exist. As timmyvos said, this might all change if Jupiter was to magically meet the conditions for stardom and begin fusing its hydrogen.
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  22. Post #22
    Life on earth in geothermal vents don't use oxygen to respire, but they are still wholly dependent for food on other organisms that use oxygen
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  23. Post #23
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    Life on earth in geothermal vents don't use oxygen to respire, but they are still wholly dependent for food on other organisms that use oxygen
    They have a separate ecosystem down there, they do not require them because they feed off of the chemicals produced by the heat vents
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  24. Post #24
    They have a separate ecosystem down there, they do not require them because they feed off of the chemicals produced by the heat vents
    no they don't that's a fucking myth

    theres' not such thing as a completely decoupled ecosystem
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  25. Post #25
    Rastadogg5's Avatar
    June 2010
    3,507 Posts
    This debate is somewhat flawed in the fact that we still have no idea what kind of factors life can form and thrive in.

    So really the answer is, who knows?
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  26. Post #26
    OvB
    Facepunch resident scientist
    OvB's Avatar
    March 2007
    13,087 Posts
    Life on earth in geothermal vents don't use oxygen to respire, but they are still wholly dependent for food on other organisms that use oxygen
    Chemosythetic organisms don't require anything more than the methane and other chemicals that come from the vents. Earths oxygen is here in the first place only because it was a waste product from photosynthesis. Oxygen is not necessary.
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  27. Post #27
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    no they don't that's a fucking myth

    theres' not such thing as a completely decoupled ecosystem
    uh there isn't alot down there, and their whole lives depend on the heat giving vents or else they would die of cold. It's like a sun for them E.G.- Shrimp, microbes, crabs taht exist down in the depths
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  28. Post #28
    Gold Member
    squids_eye's Avatar
    July 2006
    5,760 Posts
    no they don't that's a fucking myth

    theres' not such thing as a completely decoupled ecosystem
    I'm sure I read an article semi-recently about scientists discovering a colony of bacteria or something that might aswell have evolved on a different planet because they were completely cut off from other ecosystems.
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  29. Post #29
    Gold Member
    Bredirish123's Avatar
    October 2006
    9,231 Posts
    We might get lucky and find fossilized bacteria, but that's prolly it.
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  30. Post #30
    Gold Member
    teh pirate's Avatar
    March 2009
    5,305 Posts
    I'm sure I read an article semi-recently about scientists discovering a colony of bacteria or something that might aswell have evolved on a different planet because they were completely cut off from other ecosystems.
    If that were the case it'd completely revolutionize science - life occurring twice on the same planet on different occasions?
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  31. Post #31
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    If that were the case it'd completely revolutionize science - life occurring twice on the same planet on different occasions?
    It didn't revolutionize it, it just reafirmed what scientists already thought was going on.
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  32. Post #32
    Tabasco Lord
    Arc Nova's Avatar
    September 2005
    9,189 Posts
    What kind of arguments are these? It's alien-life it's going to be different than what we know life as.
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    booster's Avatar
    July 2006
    21,233 Posts
    This
    If there is life it's chemosynthetic extremeophiles feeding off the hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor because photosynthesis would be impossible due to the ice and distance from the sun. For that the planet would need to be geologically active. The ocean there has the potential to be incredibility deep. Something like 20 kilometers. (earths ocean is only 7 miles at its deepest point). Pressure there would be incredible. Europa is a very young rock and I'm not sure if it has undergone the necessary processes to develop primitive cells, whatever that may be. We won't know unless we go.
    And this
    Chemosythetic organisms don't require anything more than the methane and other chemicals that come from the vents. Earths oxygen is here in the first place only because it was a waste product from photosynthesis. Oxygen is not necessary.


    There is definitely a chance for some sort of life on Europa. I certainly hope there is.

    But unless we go there and find out for ourselves (which will be quite the challenge) we won't know if there is life or not on Europa.
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  34. Post #34
    Gold Member
    rosthouse's Avatar
    November 2007
    6,641 Posts
    The biggest problem with finding out if there is life on Europa or not isn't even getting there. It's getting through a 10 to 15 kilometers crust of ice. That's certainly something we're not ready to do yet on another planet/moon.

    Although there could exist pockets of water just 3 kilometers beneath the surface. But even getting there is hard.
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  35. Post #35
    Gold Member
    Satane's Avatar
    March 2007
    3,650 Posts
    The biggest problem with finding out if there is life on Europa or not isn't even getting there. It's getting through a 10 to 15 kilometers crust of ice. That's certainly something we're not ready to do yet on another planet/moon.

    Although there could exist pockets of water just 3 kilometers beneath the surface. But even getting there is hard.
    making a relativelly small nuclear powered drill robot shouldn't be a problem
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  36. Post #36
    kingjerome's Avatar
    December 2011
    34 Posts
    considering we haven't been to mars yet, it seems likely. Probably no complex life forms (like fish) maybe bacteria as there are bacteria that eat radioactive material and live in very high alkaline conditions and bacteria that live in the arctic in penguin shite.
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  37. Post #37
    Gold Member
    Nikita's Avatar
    April 2005
    1,926 Posts
    I remember reading that someone was planning to send an autonomous submarine robot to Europa, to get under the ice and swim around looking for any signs of life, then emerge and send signals back to Earth.
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  38. Post #38
    This title is totally OVERKILL™!
    Coyoteze's Avatar
    November 2011
    8,231 Posts
    I thought the thread title was a MASSIVE misspelling.
    Thank god it wasn't.

    I think it could be possible with some terraforming. Which reminds me, wasn't there plans to terraform Mars? But it would take like... 250,000 years?
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  39. Post #39
    CatFodder's Avatar
    August 2010
    1,027 Posts
    I remember reading that someone was planning to send an autonomous submarine robot to Europa, to get under the ice and swim around looking for any signs of life, then emerge and send signals back to Earth.
    They still are, but it's one of those 'some time in the next 20 years' things.
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  40. Post #40
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    The biggest problem with finding out if there is life on Europa or not isn't even getting there. It's getting through a 10 to 15 kilometers crust of ice. That's certainly something we're not ready to do yet on another planet/moon.

    Although there could exist pockets of water just 3 kilometers beneath the surface. But even getting there is hard.
    A Cone shaped probe powered by a nuclear material could heat the ice around it tunneling it down may work, but the risk of it detonating on the surface or contaminating the ecosystem may out weigh the pros of it.

    Edited:

    making a relativelly small nuclear powered drill robot shouldn't be a problem
    contamination is worrisome

    Edited:

    What we can use is lasers, as this technology expands we can easily heat through the ice and drop a probe in before it seals up, though a tether of some sort will be needed to send back what it's seeing

    Edited:

    I thought the thread title was a MASSIVE misspelling.
    Thank god it wasn't.

    I think it could be possible with some terraforming. Which reminds me, wasn't there plans to terraform Mars? But it would take like... 250,000 years?
    Mars has no Ozone which protects the planet from the suns radioactive rays, meaning we would have to synthesize it out of oxygen which is possible today, I thought the estimate was 25,000 years if we had the proper technology to do it at a fast rate
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