1. Post #41
    Gold Member
    markfu's Avatar
    October 2007
    6,452 Posts
    The plant hemp seems to have not gotten any attention in the last few years, with the stresses being put on the planet's oil reserve reaching peak level it seems that hemp would be the perfect alternative, its uses cover:

    Food
    Nutrition
    Medicine
    Fiber
    Building material
    Use with plastics
    Paper
    Fabric
    Cordage (rope etc)
    Water and soil purification
    Weed control

    and most importantly: A fuel source.

    My question is: can it really be the answer to a lot of our problems? It produces 25 tonnes of material per hectare per year, grows pretty much anywhere in the world and is useful as a fuel source. I understand the illegality through the cotton industry several years ago, but are there really any downsides or arguments against it other than 'it can make a drug that might make you lazy!!!!'
    I'm guessing you just watched the Union

  2. Post #42
    Gold Member
    strayebyrd's Avatar
    July 2008
    7,761 Posts
    my opinion is that they should legalise it and then if it is a far superior product that is more efficient and productive then people can use it. I've never been involved in hemp production but I think that considering its little to no THC count the illegality is pretty dumb

  3. Post #43
    MyAlt91's Avatar
    January 2009
    264 Posts
    my opinion is that they should legalise it and then if it is a far superior product that is more efficient and productive then people can use it. I've never been involved in hemp production but I think that considering its little to no THC count the illegality is pretty dumb
    I don't believe this is because of the actual drug use that is attached to the plant that makes it illegal (seeing as I wouldn't even consider hemp as a drug), rather that hemp can make multiple products like paper and some forms of medicine, and the companies who produce these products now (with wood and all kinds of chemical shit) wouldn't quite like this to happen.

    Human greed will be the downfall of the human society we know, if we don't change our ways for the better, imho.
    Then again, not just the company who makes paper would go broke (if not swapping to hemp paper), but also (and eighter way) the companies who deliver the wood, the people who chop the wood (and i'm probably missing a shitload of companies inbetween), all might go out of business.

    So somewhere, I guess were screwed.


    Edit:
    What some of you don't seem to realise though, or do not know, is that hemp is one of the easiest growing crops in the world. It's not called a "weed" for nothing.

    I've heard one of the few plants that can grow on a field which is beeing used as fallow (that's probably not the right way to use the word, but I hope you understand). It's honestly alot better than placing onions in the ground for (not even) pennies of profit.

    Edit:
    All this talk about hemp made me sober up and wan't to smoke more.
    FCUK.

  4. Post #44
    Proudly supporting the JIDF
    Dennab
    July 2010
    22,111 Posts
    I don't believe this is because of the actual drug use that is attached to the plant that makes it illegal (seeing as I wouldn't even consider hemp as a drug), rather that hemp can make multiple products like paper and some forms of medicine, and the companies who produce these products now (with wood and all kinds of chemical shit) wouldn't quite like this to happen.

    Human greed will be the downfall of the human society we know, if we don't change our ways for the better, imho.
    Then again, not just the company who makes paper would go broke (if not swapping to hemp paper), but also (and eighter way) the companies who deliver the wood, the people who chop the wood (and i'm probably missing a shitload of companies inbetween), all might go out of business.

    So somewhere, I guess were screwed.


    Edit:
    What some of you don't seem to realise though, or do not know, is that hemp is one of the easiest growing crops in the world. It's not called a "weed" for nothing.

    I've heard one of the few plants that can grow on a field which is beeing used as fallow (that's probably not the right way to use the word, but I hope you understand). It's honestly alot better than placing onions in the ground for (not even) pennies of profit.

    Edit:
    All this talk about hemp made me sober up and wan't to smoke more.
    FCUK.
    Legalise it for all I care, but don't be surprised when it replaces almost nothing.

    There is a reason the use of hemp in industry died out by the time the first laws banning it came into effect.

  5. Post #45
    Gold Member
    Lambazza's Avatar
    May 2005
    14 Posts
    Legalise it for all I care, but don't be surprised when it replaces almost nothing.

    There is a reason the use of hemp in industry died out by the time the first laws banning it came into effect.

    This man has already stated, exactly what I would have. Just wanted to reconfirm I completely agree with this man.

  6. Post #46
    electric926's Avatar
    January 2009
    1,079 Posts
    It could replace a lot of things we use, but it would most likely be really expensive. It's the same reason why ethanol still hasn't replaced gasoline as a fuel source in cars yet.

  7. Post #47
    Gold Member
    Nick Nack's Avatar
    April 2005
    1,303 Posts
    ITT: People full of ignorance spewing ignorance on other ignorant people who are attempting to spew ignorance.

    It could replace a lot of things we use, but it would most likely be really expensive. It's the same reason why ethanol still hasn't replaced gasoline as a fuel source in cars yet.
    Ethanol, if it was implemented world-wide would be much more cost effective than gasoline. The reason it hasn't become the main automotive fuel is because producing it for 1 country isn't cost effective. So basically, people aren't implementing it in a large scale because it will only be cost effective once it is implemented in a large scale. There are a few places that have ethanol stations, though.

  8. Post #48
    Gold Member
    kebab52's Avatar
    November 2009
    1,349 Posts
    Breaking news: Photosynthesis isn't effective, world is fucked, more at 11.
    The actual process of photosynthesis is very effective, however, that doesn't mean that we're going to get the same amount of energy out of it as the plant has absorbed. Energy will be lost in the manufacturing process (if it was converted to bio-diesel or something).

  9. Post #49
    electric926's Avatar
    January 2009
    1,079 Posts
    Ethanol, if it was implemented world-wide would be much more cost effective than gasoline. The reason it hasn't become the main automotive fuel is because producing it for 1 country isn't cost effective. So basically, people aren't implementing it in a large scale because it will only be cost effective once it is implemented in a large scale. There are a few places that have ethanol stations, though.
    Ethanol would be cost effective if we all used it, assuming we could survive the famine brought on by using a huge chunk of our corn crops to making ethanol.

  10. Post #50
    Gold Member
    Nick Nack's Avatar
    April 2005
    1,303 Posts
    Ethanol would be cost effective if we all used it, assuming we could survive the famine brought on by using a huge chunk of our corn crops to making ethanol.
    You're right. It's not like we would grow more corn or anything. As well, you don't NEED corn to produce ethanol.

  11. Post #51
    Gold Member
    Sunday_Roast's Avatar
    November 2007
    3,448 Posts
    If bio-fuel can be efficiently crafted from hemp, then I think that it should be used since hemp is quite easy to grow when grown en masse with professional gear. Why is hemp easy to grow? Because it's a weed (as in a plant that can grow explosively in a way that damages other plants).
    It's also good to grow hemp en masse because it's effective at binding CO2 from the air.

  12. Post #52
    Gold Member
    Zenreon117's Avatar
    April 2008
    5,577 Posts
    If bio-fuel can be efficiently crafted from hemp, then I think that it should be used since hemp is quite easy to grow when grown en masse with professional gear. Why is hemp easy to grow? Because it's a weed (as in a plant that can grow explosively in a way that damages other plants).
    It's also good to grow hemp en masse because it's effective at binding C2O from the air.
    C2O! Dicarbon monoxide, were all fucked!

    No but seriously, hemp was illegalized simply because of its ability to replace so many other fields of inefficient industry.

  13. Post #53
    Gold Member
    J Paul's Avatar
    October 2007
    2,882 Posts
    Well, we know now that it could have supplemented or completely dominated certain production markets, but at the time, hemp was only postured to potentially be a financial problem for certain parties, once certain technologies were available. It's important to think about it in this perspective, because now that we're dealing with the dilemma of internet censorship, we must think back to this period in history.

    Certain parties with a stake in certain industries are now vying to see to the destruction of something that is postured to be a potential competitor, just as it was before.

    It's maddening to think that people still haven't changed their behavior, given that that we live with this abundance of information, and that we have the ability to read about the past to gain perspective about the present and the future.

  14. Post #54
    Proudly supporting the JIDF
    Dennab
    July 2010
    22,111 Posts
    No but seriously, hemp was illegalized simply because of its ability to replace so many other fields of inefficient industry.
    Not really. Cotton is vastly more efficent to grow and mass produce as cloth than hemp. Despite hemp not being made illegal until the 20th century, we see a massive decline in hemp production as cotton production rose during the 18th and 19th centuries.