1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Smoot's Avatar
    December 2006
    2,441 Posts
    I'd like to start off with a very dirty issue I have been having my with Trailblazer: RUST. I bought my 2002 Trailblazer in 2010 as a Massachusetts car. The previous owner put good mileage on it up there, having it endure 8 or 9 winters. I have moved to Florida since, but the fact it has been through so much snow and salt still pesters me.

    Since I have gotten the vehicle I have had the following happen:

    1. The transmission cooler lines burst due to rotting and drained the entire supply of transmission coolant. I found this out by the gears slipping. I had it fixed within 10 or so miles of finding out. Luckily there does not appear to be permanent transmission damage.

    2. The power steering cooling block at the front of the radiator sprung a leak. I found this out by the sudden onset of a very recognizable power steering motor wine. I had the lines replaced very quickly.

    3. It appears as though I am faced with another power steering issue. I am now leaking a sufficient amount of power steering fluid that I have to put in a small amount every few days to prevent the power steering motor from running dry. This is a current issue and I need some thoughts on how to best go about it.

    I believe I have identified the problem area:



    This is a view of the drivers side engine compartment, directly over the wheel. You can see where the liquid is leaking by the darkened, oily metal where the lines make contact with the frame.

    I brought my truck to a repair shop for a full diagnostic to see what else might fail soon. Luckily nothing else appears to be rotting (I especially had the brake lines checked).

    So so far I know only that specific part of the lines where they are mounted on the frame are rusted. The rest of the line is good as it is freestanding where water and salt couldn't rest on the lines.



    #5 is where the problem is. That part is mounted on top of the wheel well to the frame. It is my understanding a high pressure and a low pressure line run through there. Unfortunately the only place to get a replacement is the dealer. There are no aftermarket products that I can find. The dealer replacement is expensive too, about $300 for the high pressure line and $200 or something for the low pressure line. The problem is you get the WHOLE thing so it takes a long ass time to replace it (thus increasing labor fees). I am stuck with a $900 bill I can't afford.

    So here is a question: what pressure does the high pressure line run at? I am thinking maybe it would be possible to cut out that 5"(or so) section and replace it with rubber lines and clamp them to the frame. Does this sound like a viable solution? I have the resources to do it I just was to be cautious. It could turn a $900 into a $20 fix. There is no point in replacing the whole thing as the rest of the lines are free of rust.

  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,038 Posts
    Low pressure line is just that, low pressure.. it's a return line, and your proposed fix would be adequate for it.

    The high pressure, though, needs proper replacement.
    I'd assume you could like.. cut it, flare it, then make connections very similar to replacing a section of brake line.. but it's nothing I've ever done, always just replaced the whole line in the past.