1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Xonax's Avatar
    October 2010
    8,954 Posts
    There are not many shows on television that deserve to be called true American institutions – but one of them is surely “Sesame Street.” It’s been on the air now for almost 50 years. When Sesame Street began in 1969, it was considered an experiment. The question: Could television be used to educate young children? Well, research proved the answer to be yes, and the nonprofit children’s television workshop -- now called Sesame Workshop -- that created the show, has been refining and expanding that mission ever since, everything from ABC’s and 123’s, to race, and even death. In a few weeks, Sesame Street -- which now airs on HBO as well as its longtime home on PBS -- will take on its latest challenge: introducing a new kid on the street. A Muppet named Julia, who has autism. ...... Christine Ferraro: I think the big discussion right at the start was, “How do we do this? How do we talk about autism?”

    Christine Ferraro has been a writer at Sesame Street for 25 years, during which time the frequency of autism diagnoses has multiplied.

    Lesley Stahl: The chances of a little kid two, three, four years old having some kind of a relationship with another kid with autism is pretty high.

    Christine Ferraro: Exactly. Especially once they hit school age, because they’ll be in their classrooms.

    Abby: Julia, you’re so creative!

    Julia: [laughs and flaps]
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/julia-se...muppet-autism/

    As someone with Autism, I think this is great.
    From the bits I read in the article, they've captured some of the stuff I did as a kid, so it seems they are on the right track.
    If this goes well, hopefully more people will understand Autism in the future.
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  2. Post #2
    KING
    of OVER – REACTING
    “No jokes allowed!!!”
    ROFLBURGER's Avatar
    May 2009
    22,948 Posts
    I didn't read the article before posting.

    (heres the link: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/julia-se...muppet-autism/)

    Edited:

    “Sesame Street” has always based its characters and content on extensive research. They regularly bring in educators and child psychologists. In the case of Julia, they also worked with autism organizations to decide which characteristics she should have and how best to normalize autism for all children.
    Christine Ferraro: I would-- I would love her to be. I would love her to be not Julia, the kid on “Sesame Street” who has autism. I would like her to be just Julia.
    That's pretty good that they didn't half-ass it and do it for a terrible reason.
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  3. Post #3
    I WOTCH ANIEM
    Maximo13's Avatar
    October 2008
    7,778 Posts
    That's pretty good that they didn't half-ass it and do it for a terrible reason.
    It's one of the longest running children's shows. If anything I trust them to do it to be educational and not just to fill some quota.
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  4. Post #4
    Idiots will respond to this by claiming it's a pointless and unnecessary appeal to diversity and shit like that.
    The reality is there are more people with an autism diagnosis than ever, and children's media is the perfect method to talk to those children directly in a way many of them will be able to appreciate. Both the autistic children, and their peers.
    Of course children can always be cruel, but I'd bet if we had this kind of thing in cartoons and the like, children would understand autism more and there would be less bullying of autistic kids. When I was a kid I was misdiagnosed with asperger's syndrome and I went the whole mile. The way we educate kids of their autism is unacceptably bad, and it shattered my self esteem. I'd like to spare other kids from that.
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  5. Post #5
    Steel & Iron's Avatar
    February 2013
    8,544 Posts
    It's been a while since I've watched, but I seem to remember a few years ago the US Sesame Street added a puppet who's dad was doing jail time, and one in the Middle East somewhere that wears a hijab. Something like a character with autism is pretty much par for the course.
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  6. Post #6
    Glod Member
    ZombieDawgs's Avatar
    March 2009
    11,150 Posts
    Any good representation for people with mental disabilities is always welcome, it's absurd how much people still shit on them just by simply using the word 'retarded' or 'lol u have autisms!!!'. It's infuriating.
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  7. Post #7
    Any good representation for people with mental disabilities is always welcome, it's absurd how much people still shit on them just by simply using the word 'retarded' or 'lol u have autisms!!!'. It's infuriating.
    Probably because our entire generation was taught about autism poorly/not at all.
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  8. Post #8
    Naci's Sidekick
    FlakTheMighty's Avatar
    July 2010
    11,604 Posts
    Probably because our entire generation was taught about autism poorly/not at all.
    There's also a negative stereotype because "they're all just retarded" has been around for ages.
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  9. Post #9
    Mr. Sarcastic's Avatar
    January 2017
    233 Posts
    At least we still have Sesame Street and the National Endowments for the Arts right guys?

  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    LondierX's Avatar
    December 2012
    1,282 Posts
    Why is this news, I thought she's been a character for a year now?
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  11. Post #11
    Mr Kotov's Avatar
    July 2010
    636 Posts
    Probably because our entire generation was taught about autism poorly/not at all.
    Autism education is completely terrible.

    My old job involved working with autistic folk among other disabilities, and the public perception of autism is just completely wrong.
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  12. Post #12
    Ginger gizzard amateur~
    Scarabix's Avatar
    July 2011
    4,750 Posts
    But, sesame street already had an autistic character, right? Either that or this article is a repost, I think.

    If it isn't, of course there's no limit that needs to be set on how many autistic characters can fit inside a children's show. As long as the appeal to the, shall I say, core audience remains, it's good representation, I think.

  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    mdeceiver79's Avatar
    March 2012
    7,052 Posts
    Any good representation for people with mental disabilities is always welcome, it's absurd how much people still shit on them just by simply using the word 'retarded' or 'lol u have autisms!!!'. It's infuriating.
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
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  14. Post #14
    Blue Member
    Riller's Avatar
    October 2006
    6,412 Posts
    But, sesame street already had an autistic character, right? Either that or this article is a repost, I think.

    If it isn't, of course there's no limit that needs to be set on how many autistic characters can fit inside a children's show. As long as the appeal to the, shall I say, core audience remains, it's good representation, I think.
    It's the same character. She was introduced in 2015 in books and other sesame-street media, but now she's entering the main TV show. As far as I understand it, anyway.
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  15. Post #15
    Killed postal with a fart once.
    gk99's Avatar
    December 2007
    15,080 Posts
    My girlfriend's brother has autism, and while all the dumb fucks he goes to school with are no longer Sesame Street age, hopefully this cuts down on the type of bullying he's had to deal with in the future.
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  16. Post #16
    Glod Member
    ZombieDawgs's Avatar
    March 2009
    11,150 Posts
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    It's a strange line to skirt when discussing these topics, I'm all for outright desensitization of these kinds of words because it means that people aren't subjugated to them as harshly, but at the same time I don't think it's entirely possible, the best course of action would be to push them towards the same standard as calling somebody a 'coon' which no matter what way you look at it, that word is deeply offensive.

    I realise 'retard' is slowly being disassociated with mental disabilities and just a general catch insult akin to calling somebody gay (which still has an air of iffyness about it), but for somebody with those disabilities it's similar to being called a nigger, kike, fag, dyke or whatever insult you want to think of that directly targets somebody's heritage, race or biological feature. It's hurtful, intentionally undermines them and pushes them back, or directly insults somebody by comparing them to something and implying they're "lesser" becaues of it.

    You have to be careful about the usage of these words because unlike "cunt" which is just a harsh swear word, these have deep societal weight behind them and aren't just a general insult you can throw around. Calling somebody a retard is directly comparing them to somebody with a mental disability, and telling them they're lesser for it.

    The use of the word can easily be forced out of a vocabulary, just don't say it it's a concious effort of course. I wouldn't necessarily call the discussion of these words PC-brigade stuff, like I mentioned, you're directly saying a person is lesser because you're comparing them to someone else who has a different skin colour, sexual orientation or mental disability.
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  17. Post #17
    Dennab
    October 2015
    1,376 Posts
    That's so cool that symmetra is joining sesame street
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  18. Post #18
    AutismoPiggo's Avatar
    July 2016
    702 Posts
    I have only one problem with this and sadly, its a horrible one.

    She's not a pig.
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  19. Post #19
    Ona
    insert sausage
    Ona's Avatar
    June 2013
    1,046 Posts
    Folks need to remember that Autism Spectrum Disorder was only deemed a proper diagnosis 4 years ago. Before then, "Autism" was pinned on everything from juvenile ADHD to full blown schizophrenia. It's no wonder there's so much misinformation and fear about it out there.

    Then you've got shows like Sherlock and Big-Bang Theory that paint autistic people as socially awkward genius savants with zero grasp of human interaction.

    I think it's great that we're finally seeing some autistic characters represented properly in the media, and Sesame Street is one of those things that I think most of us grew up with. A great choice by the writers and it seems like they're doing the presentation properly.

    Step in the right direction, glad to hear some good news for once.
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  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    ChickenMan99's Avatar
    December 2009
    2,017 Posts
    Normalising autism in kid's media is good.
    In addition to making it less of a 'freak' thing, it might make those who aren't diagnosed aware of it and raise questions about it (I can relate to this part).
    Good on the Sesame Street team.
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  21. Post #21
    Not actually a glitch
    Glitchman's Avatar
    May 2005
    6,763 Posts
    I think it's fine, it's good to have something those kids can identify with (even if subconsciously, I doubt a lot of complex social issues resonate with young children)

    But I think as a society we still need to understand what causes autism or other neurological disorders and find a way to prevent them, like any disability.

  22. Post #22
    Gold Member
    HumanAbyss's Avatar
    March 2009
    28,757 Posts
    Nothing wrong with this if they handle it with tact

    kind of a shame how that's how it has to be sold though, i'm with the guy on the ideal "It would be great if she was just "Julia"".
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  23. Post #23
    Skate 3 glitch wizard
    Helix Snake's Avatar
    September 2006
    4,024 Posts
    Folks need to remember that Autism Spectrum Disorder was only deemed a proper diagnosis 4 years ago. Before then, "Autism" was pinned on everything from juvenile ADHD to full blown schizophrenia. It's no wonder there's so much misinformation and fear about it out there.
    I mean, Aspergers has been around for decades, I was diagnosed in 2000.
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  24. Post #24
    Gold Member
    Tetsmega's Avatar
    October 2006
    9,148 Posts
    Hold the fuck up

    When were the Sesame Street puppets called Muppets? I thought Muppets referred to an entirely different franchise?

  25. Post #25
    AnnieOakley's Avatar
    June 2013
    1,947 Posts
    Hold the fuck up

    When were the Sesame Street puppets called Muppets? I thought Muppets referred to an entirely different franchise?
    They're connected via Jim Henson having a heavy involvement in its ongoing development.
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  26. Post #26
    Gold Member
    Tamschi's Avatar
    December 2009
    7,909 Posts
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    I posted a multi-post rant in the programming WAYWO when this came up once a while ago
    (Edited: I can't find it right now, unfortunately. I was pretty angry when writing them, so those posts are more cohesive than this one.)

    IIrc the gist was this:
    If the words make you personally uncomfortable (for whatever reason, doesn't matter if you're neurotypical or not), then by all means feel free to complain about that.
    However, if you only think someone else will have a problem in that regard, you need to consider the environment and the way you convey that criticism, and whether the issue really exists.

    Often when 'normal people' try to do autism advocacy, they massively overshoot the target and end up portraying everyone on the spectrum as raw eggs. (We aren't necessarily more fragile than the average person, even if we occasionally get overwhelmed by certain things.)

    If you're in a school or whatever then sure, you should language-police there because it's really the only way to deal with this stuff.
    If you're in a professional context of any kind or any other place that's full of adults (and no-one's being directly insulted) though, you need to figure out if it's actually a problem for the people in question first.

    It's usually pretty difficult to get people (who don't know me well already) to treat me normally if I actually (for some reason have to) tell them I'm on the spectrum.
    Normally the stereotype actually makes it easier to occasionally apologise for perceived rudeness than to explain what's really going on with me. It's seriously annoying.


    In any case, take this with a grain of salt. I appear pretty much normal to most people (now) and I really don't need disability accommodation often. (If you’ve met one person with autism etc., basically.)
    I actually don't mind that autism is thrown around as a joke in gaming circles so much either, since it means I can talk about this stuff here without getting the usual pity in return. That's probably pretty subjective though.

  27. Post #27
    Hates Ayn Rand
    1239the's Avatar
    December 2005
    1,387 Posts
    unsurprising to see a lot of puerile anger (not here, elsewhere) directed at this being covered with the flimsy-as-film excuse of "it's forced".

  28. Post #28
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    personally, i think "retard" is going the way of idiot and stupid, both of which were medical diagnoses at some point, which i think is for the best. afaik the current medical nomenclature is "developmentally challenged" which i think is both more accurate, less bagged with societal weight, and also more difficult to say off the cuff as an insult which is partially why "retarded", "idiot", and "stupid" are all intelligence-based insults. they're just too easy to say and the colloquial meaning gets across easily and quickly

  29. Post #29
    Gold Member
    butre's Avatar
    July 2008
    18,645 Posts
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    I don't consider loon to be derogatory. I always took it to refer to the common loon, as the phrase "crazy as a loon" doesn't fit in with other terms like spaz or retard. you don't say someone is "dumb as a retard", you just say they're retarded. it's also worth noting that "crazy as a coot" is an alternative version and it's in reference to another bird that's brave, not all that intelligent, and has a weird call, all similar to the loon.

  30. Post #30
    Valiantttt's Avatar
    January 2013
    5,768 Posts
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    Personally I do not see an issue with mental diseases being used as an insult.

    Of course, this is partly because of the culture in the Netherlands, curses are often times things like cancer(the biggest insult) or other diseases, although not mentally.

    And I have never seen anyone who called someone autistic or retarded actually hate the people who actually have the disease. Mostly just to say "you are acting like somebody who isn't completely of control" I guess.

    As for the character, I do not see a big issue with it as long it is done well.

  31. Post #31
    Gold Member
    mdeceiver79's Avatar
    March 2012
    7,052 Posts
    I don't consider loon to be derogatory. I always took it to refer to the common loon, as the phrase "crazy as a loon" doesn't fit in with other terms like spaz or retard. you don't say someone is "dumb as a retard", you just say they're retarded. it's also worth noting that "crazy as a coot" is an alternative version and it's in reference to another bird that's brave, not all that intelligent, and has a weird call, all similar to the loon.
    I loon came from lunatic

  32. Post #32
    Gold Member
    doommarine23's Avatar
    December 2005
    10,436 Posts
    Personally I do not see an issue with mental diseases being used as an insult.

    Of course, this is partly because of the culture in the Netherlands, curses are often times things like cancer(the biggest insult) or other diseases, although not mentally.

    And I have never seen anyone who called someone autistic or retarded actually hate the people who actually have the disease. Mostly just to say "you are acting like somebody who isn't completely of control" I guess.

    As for the character, I do not see a big issue with it as long it is done well.
    That in of itself is the problem. People don't choose to have autism, cancer, depression, none of it. But with physical disorders and diseases its easier to treat and more importantly, easier to gain sympathy or understanding.

    But when you turn things like autism into an insult, it dehumanizes the people with it and adds a further negative association with the disorder and the word, more than it needs to have.

    This is coming from a hypocrite, I will admit. Sometimes I call shit autistic, gay, or say "that gave me cancer" and I think all of us do that. But I got my limits, and I realize the effects of what I and other people do.

    So yeah, no one really cares that you say something is autistic, its that globally we all do it, and insult others with it, and I gotta admit that must really suck for people with autism to have their disorder and struggle be used as an insult, when they already struggle to be seen as human; let alone equal.

    If we lived in a world where people understood it was just a disorder and there is an equal human underneath, it wouldn't be a big deal, but we don't live in that society and thus, it is a big deal.
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    butre's Avatar
    July 2008
    18,645 Posts
    I loon came from lunatic
    lunacy isn't a real mental disorder though. the thinking of the time was "this guy is weird, must be the moon's fault." hence the name, lunacy as in lunar.

  34. Post #34
    Boilermaker's Avatar
    December 2015
    62 Posts
    unsurprising to see a lot of puerile anger (not here, elsewhere) directed at this being covered with the flimsy-as-film excuse of "it's forced".
    In some circles, I can understand why this may come off as 'forced', but its exactly those circles that are the target demographic of this.

    Even if it were 'forced', sometimes thats a necessary sacrifice when the payoff is a more inclusive society, but the whole purpose of Sesame Street is to educate children. The addition of a character with autism, in concept, is exactly what they should be doing.
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  35. Post #35
    Gold Member
    elowin's Avatar
    December 2009
    13,740 Posts
    Ah shit

    Recently I've been using the "retarded" thing more and more. Sorry dawg

    I should probs brush up on my vocab to avoid that.

    That whole political correctness thing seeps into the discussion. The anti-pc bridge go on about how they should be able to say anything but if its upsetting people should they? Or worse if its conveying bad stereo types - people with mental disabilities being stupid, jews being greedy, black people being (list of bad stuff) should they say it?

    Tough to figure out whats right because stuff like "reee" carries a meaning which you can't concisely convey with words. But its origin is mocking autistic people. Stuff like "retard" is commonly used as a stronger version of stupid but its obviously unpleasant for people with actual mental issues - I knew a girl who was a "slow processor" (technical term I think) but she was super smart 1st student at uni.

    The way language evolves naturally over time means artificially creating words to fill these gaps is unlikely to work and people will continue to use those words out of habit (hard to disassociate word) and necessity (situations where you feel that word, because of its unofficial meaning, is the best word to use). Its the wrong word to use but realistically its unlikely another word can replace it.

    Bit of a ramble, I retyped it 3 times because wasn't mega sure about it. One of my first draft called the anti-pc brigade loons, which was itself a derogatory phrase for people with mental issues, it's like a minefield a bit. I understand why you have issues with people using those words. If people use retard to mean stupid and retard for mental issues then they'll associate mental issues with stupidity which is pretty tragic, unfair and incorrect.
    I don't know mate, as someone who is themselves mentally handicapped I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with using words like "retarded" neither in the technical sense of someone/something that is slow nor in it's more common usage as a step beyond idiot. It's just a word. Words don't have meaning beyond what you apply to them. The word retard can be used in a derogatory fashion towards disabled people, but if it isn't being used in that fashion then that fact is frankly irrelevant.

  36. Post #36
    Svinnik's Avatar
    June 2013
    5,673 Posts
    I mean, Aspergers has been around for decades, I was diagnosed in 2000.
    Aspergers doesnt exist anymore actually, it's all under the fold of Autism Spectrum Disorder
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  37. Post #37
    Gold Member
    butre's Avatar
    July 2008
    18,645 Posts
    Aspergers doesnt exist anymore actually, it's all under the fold of Autism Spectrum Disorder
    it's still in ICD-10, just not DSM-5
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  38. Post #38
    maddogsamurai's Avatar
    October 2012
    4,723 Posts
    It's one of the longest running children's shows. If anything I trust them to do it to be educational and not just to fill some quota.
    This. If its Sesame Street doing it, I'm fine with that as someone who was diagnosed with Asperger's, then finally autistic (this was done in the 90's which explains it). Aside from that, I had a feeling that this was done before. I could swear it was debated that there were several numerous animated characters that were autistic or on the spectrum.

  39. Post #39

    January 2017
    390 Posts
    Aspergers doesnt exist anymore actually, it's all under the fold of Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Well, not according wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome

  40. Post #40
    Naci's Sidekick
    FlakTheMighty's Avatar
    July 2010
    11,604 Posts
    https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-au...erger-syndrome

    "Asperger syndrome is one of several previously separate subtypes of autism that were folded into the single diagnosis autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with the publication of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual in 2013."

    Edited:

    Also from the Wikipedia page

    "Standard diagnostic criteria require impairment in social interaction and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, activities and interests, without significant delay in language or cognitive development. Unlike the international standard,[28] the DSM-IV-TR criteria also required significant impairment in day-to-day functioning;[31] DSM-5 eliminated AS as a separate diagnosis in 2013, and folded it into the umbrella of autism spectrum disorders.[25] Other sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed by Szatmari et al.[66] and by Gillberg and Gillberg.[67]"
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