1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    I am looking to change my brakes in my Tacoma. I am running down to the local parts store in the next few days and dont want to pay for labor so I am going to get a few people to help out. Are there any guides out there for that kind of work. If not I have to drive half an hour to go see my mechanic buddy and give him beer for his labor.

  2. Post #2
    cNova's Avatar
    May 2009
    2,785 Posts
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  3. Post #3
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    I got my pads and rotors from the local store. Wasnt too bad. So What kind of tools do I need exactly?

  4. Post #4
    cNova's Avatar
    May 2009
    2,785 Posts
    I dont really know how to change the rotors .. i googled a bit and found this videos

    2004 Toyota Tacoma Brakes and Rotors replacement:
    part 1
    part 2 -end-

    Good luck with that

    edit:
    Also .. heres a HD video "Rear Brake Pad & Rotor Replacement" on a Impala .. maybe it'll help a bit
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  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    Tacomas have rear drums which I know are a bitch to do. The drums are still fine my fronts are getting bad though.

    Edited:

    I dont really know how to change the rotors .. i googled a bit and found this videos

    2004 Toyota Tacoma Brakes and Rotors replacement:
    part 1
    part 2 -end-

    Good luck with that

    edit:
    Also .. heres a HD video "Rear Brake Pad & Rotor Replacement" on a Impala .. maybe it'll help a bit
    First 2 vids are a great help. Gave me a basic understanding of how to do it. Though should I drain the brake fluid or not. One vid says yes other says no.

  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    Front's easy, get a set of metric sockets and alan heads (Or just look at the bolts holding on the caliper and get the right socket for those, it's all you have to take off). Get a big C-clamp. Get a fairly large (But not ridiculously large) flathead screwdriver, one that won't bend under light prying force.

    Jack up the front end, or one side of it at a time to be safe, pop the wheel off (Break the nuts loose on the ground). Unbolt the caliper. Use the flathead in the hole in the side of the caliper (where you can see the pads) and pry lightly on the pad on the backside of the rotor, this will loosen the caliper enough to get it off.

    When you get it off, pop the hood and remove the master cylinder cap (so pressure doesn't build up in the reservoir). Use the c-clamp and one of the used pads (Don't clamp against the piston itself) and push the piston into the caliper (Not completely flush but it should get close).

    Put on your new pads, slap the caliper back on, and bolt it down. Put the cap on the master cylinder and pump your brakes a few time. The pressure will build back up and the pads should be against the rotor again, as per normal.

    Repeat for the other side. If you have all the tools and take your time, you're looking at about an hour's work, if that. Front disc brakes usually take about 10-15 minutes a side.

  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    Front's easy, get a set of metric sockets and alan heads (Or just look at the bolts holding on the caliper and get the right socket for those, it's all you have to take off). Get a big C-clamp. Get a fairly large (But not ridiculously large) flathead screwdriver, one that won't bend under light prying force.

    Jack up the front end, or one side of it at a time to be safe, pop the wheel off (Break the nuts loose on the ground). Unbolt the caliper. Use the flathead in the hole in the side of the caliper (where you can see the pads) and pry lightly on the pad on the backside of the rotor, this will loosen the caliper enough to get it off.

    When you get it off, pop the hood and remove the master cylinder cap (so pressure doesn't build up in the reservoir). Use the c-clamp and one of the used pads (Don't clamp against the piston itself) and push the piston into the caliper (Not completely flush but it should get close).

    Put on your new pads, slap the caliper back on, and bolt it down. Put the cap on the master cylinder and pump your brakes a few time. The pressure will build back up and the pads should be against the rotor again, as per normal.

    Repeat for the other side. If you have all the tools and take your time, you're looking at about an hour's work, if that. Front disc brakes usually take about 10-15 minutes a side.
    thanks, what about adding changing rotors into that.

  8. Post #8
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,352 Posts
    When you're doing this there's some imperative steps to make sure you don't have issues down the road.

    1. Clean the surface the rotor sits on if it's crusty. Rust likes to build up on the hub, and if it's not completely smooth you can warp the rotors. Get some emery clothe or a rust buster disc and smooth it, then put anti-seize on it.

    2. Clean the surface behind the pad sliders. On your caliper bracket there's small stamped metal channels that clip onto it, then the pads slide on them. Rust builds up behind them and squeezes the pads, not letting them slide eventually, causing premature wear.
    Pop the stamped metal slides out, and use a rust buster disc/ file to clean any rust off, then anti-seize them. Then put the slides back on (or the new slides if you got pads with them), and anti seize those, too, for smoothe pad sliding.

    3. Make sure the caliper slides are free. The floating caliper has two slides of some sort.. usually the bolts that hold the caliper to the caliper bracket pull all the way out and the slides are integrated, or the caliper bolts thread into the slides. Either way... pull these out, wiped off the old grease, and lube with new caliper grease (don't skimp on this). Slide them back in and make sure they slide easily, and the rubber boot is in place. If it's not they'll rust and lock up.
    If the slides don't come out easily, manhandle them out, then wire wheel the slides until they're corrosion free. Clean the inside of the slide channels if they're been locked up. Lube well, and you're good.

    4. Clean the rotors off with brake clean. There's and oil film on them that isn't good for the pads, so spray and wipe them down before you pop them on.

    5. Not 100% necessary, but applying disc brake quiet to the back of the pads is a good habit. It'll effectively glue the pads to the caliper so they don't have the chance to vibrate very slightly, which is what causes squeaking when stopping sometimes.

    Those things are the difference between just ripping it apart and slapping new parts on (incorrect way), and doing a proper brake job that you can count on will last you many thousands of miles.

    Also.. don't worry about draining the brake fluid.. all that happens if as you push the caliper pistons in , it may over flow. If you want to suck it out so you don't have to deal with the spillage, feel free to do that, too. Personal preference.

    Edited:

    Bleh, just remembered... I think Toyota made the brakes on those with pistons on either side. Disregard the caliper slides, in this case... since it's not a floating caliper design.

    However.. this makes removing the disc a little trickier. There's two options.

    1. Unbolt the caliper and try to maneuver it over the disc. I've had certain non floating calipers that connect to a bracket with hard brake line, which makes this a little scary... but be gentle and you may b able to move it, just like removing a normal caliper, and then pull the disc off.

    2. Split the caliper in two pieces. A couple bolts hold one side of the caliper to the other... unfortunately brakes fluid also travels from one side to the other. So.. first off crack open the bleeder to make sure it'll open for you. If not... don't continue because bleeding is an issue then. If it opens, great. Close it back up and remove the bolts that hold the two halves together. Pull off the outside part and remove the disc. For reassembly, put it back together, then bleed the brake calipers until air stops coming out.

    That's all I got for now.

  9. Post #9
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    thanks, what about adding changing rotors into that.
    You can get the rotors off with the caliper off (If you remove it with the bracket). They come right off, if they're a bit frozen up on the hub center PB blast them (WD-40, w/e works) and pop the center of them with a small hammer. You don't need to remove them if you aren't replacing them, and you don't need to replace them unless they've gotten grooved or have been turned down on a lathe so much that they are too thin to do so again and are grooved to the point that they need it.

    Everything clutch said is common sense, anyone doing mechanic work should thoroughly clean everything they pulled off that is being reused. It's not always neccessary but should generally be done anyways.

    And you're right, Clutch, there are no caliper slides on that model of Tacoma. But there are two styles of brake caliper, one with single piston and one with four pistons (two on each side). The four piston caliper was not on base model trucks, and not on ANY model with the four banger. And it is also four bolts, not two, holding the caliper together.

    Make sure you get the right pads for your calipers, I'm going to guess it's the single piston caliper, but you better check.

  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,352 Posts
    Lol common sense isn't so common.. I don't see a lot of DIY'ers who don't go to the extents that are necessary simply because they didn't know they need to do that much. I've seen tons of "pull one caliper bolt, flip it up, slap new pads in, flips it down, bolt in, done" to save time by the "pros", too. Flat rate encourages laziness.

    I'm curious, though, how would a caliper with one piston not have slides? It's gotta float somehow so that there's a clamping force. Never seen non floating 1 pistons.

  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    Thank you all for the advise. I know how to do most of it by myself and I do have a few friends who work as mechanics with lexus so I can double check with them if I need anything else. They were away for the week on vacation.

  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    Lol common sense isn't so common.. I don't see a lot of DIY'ers who don't go to the extents that are necessary simply because they didn't know they need to do that much. I've seen tons of "pull one caliper bolt, flip it up, slap new pads in, flips it down, bolt in, done" to save time by the "pros", too. Flat rate encourages laziness.

    I'm curious, though, how would a caliper with one piston not have slides? It's gotta float somehow so that there's a clamping force. Never seen non floating 1 pistons.
    Not exactly sure, but the caliper itself is threaded. I've never seen anything quite like it. Seem most of them are actually the 4 piston caliper, though, so really it's hard to get an idea of how it is set up. If you find some pictures or detailed info on the single piston setup, let me know. I'm interested to see why the caliper is threaded. I know it has to float somehow, otherwise unequal force is applied to the rotor and that is a very bad thing.

    Edited:

    Turns out that the caliper isn't threaded, incorrect pictures on the parts websites I've been poking around on. On the single piston calipers, they bolt to the bracket with regular ol' slide bolts.

  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,352 Posts
    Oo. The ones where the caliper has threads slide on these:


    The slides are lubed and go into holes on the bracket. Then they're held in with the thread on the caliper.

    That the setup you're talking about?

  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    Yeah. It's the weirdest shit I've ever seen.

    Have you ever seen a brake setup like that before?

  15. Post #15
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,352 Posts
    Yea, newer GMs like them. Buick has a few models, Park Avenue and Century I remember for sure.



    Much better than this older GM crap:

    Which strips outs every damn time, then the slides turn into this:


    Then there's these, seems common across the board.. which is pretty nice, but when the bolt corrodes to the slide the slide just spins, can be kinda a pain. I've also seen the bolt come loose and fall out before on this type. Yikes.




    Then there's this piece of garbage...

    Guys.. guys... lets make it super easy to change the pads guys. Listen, guys.. all you have to do it.. no really guys listen to this. All you have to do is punch out the pins. And the pads come right out! No bolts to remove.

    Oh wait it never works like that. :p

  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    Toyota made it pretty easy. pull a pin, take out bolts, compress pistons, pull out and change.

  17. Post #17
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    On the hondas I am accustomed to working on mostly (88-91, 92-95, 96-00), you take one bolt out and use a C-clamp to compress the piston after swinging it down. Then slap your new pads in and swing the assembly back up, and put one bolt in. Effective, i've never had problems with it. Jap once stripped the bolt out, but that was just him being sucky at working on cars.

  18. Post #18
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    Phrozen99's Avatar
    May 2006
    2,335 Posts
    Toyota made it pretty easy. pull a pin, take out bolts, compress pistons, pull out and change.
    Almost are newish cars are like that. I just did my rears today in 30 minutes.
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  19. Post #19
    Gold Member
    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    We finally got it done and it took 6 hours because toyota is fucktarded on their pre 2004 trucks. They wheel hub is in front of the rotor so you have to take off the bearings and repack them. They guy that worked on it before this time tightened bolts way too tightly so we had to put 600 lbs of force on a bolt to get it off. And Toyota put the brake line in front of the caliper bolts. As well, advanced auto parts gave me 4WD Rotors not 2WD rotors so we had to make a trip there too.

  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,352 Posts
    Is this how the fronts were???


    What a POS setup... that's pretty oldschool for an 03'.

    Also.. chances are the bolts were tightened just fine (they gotta be pretty tight..), but rust gets in there and seizes them up a bit.
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  21. Post #21
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    Waffle99's Avatar
    July 2006
    2,233 Posts
    Is this how the fronts were???


    What a POS setup... that's pretty oldschool for an 03'.

    Also.. chances are the bolts were tightened just fine (they gotta be pretty tight..), but rust gets in there and seizes them up a bit.
    the bolts were tightened too tight. We hand to clamp the old rotor and use 600 lbs of force to get a bolt off on the driver side. It was like the guy who did it before used a 1200 ft/lb impact gun on it. All we had was a 150 ft/lb (electric gun) and a 2 ft long socket wrench.