1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    The Godfather is a series of gangster epics by Francis Ford Coppola.
    The reason I'm making this thread, is because I think there is more to talk about in terms of the world presented here, than pretty much any other gangster movie out there.

    I'm not the one to say "well it's the best gangster movie out there, because it just is". We could watch some longer gangster movies like "Goodfellas", "The Departed" or "American Gangster" but I wouldn't call these epics because they focus so much on the character aspect rather than the "world" in which the stories take place.
    Scarface however, is comparable to Godfather in some respects.

    But in the case of the The Godfather, we have sequels which have expanded the original story into this big world in which there is so much to think about.
    Could we have a sequel to any of the other gangster movies I mentioned? Probably not, except for "Goodfellas" which did have a companion gangster movie of "Casino".

    Like any "epic", for example, Schindler's List, Lawrence of Arabia or Braveheart. These require lots of time and space for you to become immersed in the "world" rather than a singular priority.

    I've found that there is a version of The Godfather which is edited together in order of "Timeline" making this 9 and a half hour movie in 5 parts.
    I'm not sure whether it's worth watching but it might be worth doing some day.


    Are you a fan? If not, post your thoughts.

    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Winner Winner x 8 (list)

  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    Hoboiam's Avatar
    December 2005
    2,431 Posts
    I've only seen the first one once on a grainy vhs. Fantastic, even with the shoddy sound quality and terrible video, it was fantastic, I need to find a DVD copy for cheap.

  3. Post #3
    The Feral Chicken formerly known as "El Pollo Diablo"
    RaptorBlackz's Avatar
    January 2008
    4,172 Posts
    I have not seen the godfather but ive heard alot of good stuff from it.

  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    I've only seen the first one once on a grainy vhs. Fantastic, even with the shoddy sound quality and terrible video, it was fantastic, I need to find a DVD copy for cheap.
    Get the Restoration Blu Ray or DVD. They did a superb job of it, it looks so crystal clear that you'd be amazed it was a 40 year old movie.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    Lord Pirate's Avatar
    January 2007
    592 Posts
    I watched all three of them in HD practically in a row over one weekend and by the end I was practically speaking Italian. It's a fantastic trilogy and easy to see why they are considered some of the best films ever made.

    The first one is definitely the best.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP United Kingdom Show Events Friendly Friendly x 1 (list)

  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    The first one is definitely the best.
    Definitely the easiest to watch, but in some respects the second is better. It's basically 2 movies in the one.

  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    broodroos's Avatar
    July 2005
    183 Posts
    As a child I could only get into the second one, it has alot of action and a quicker pace. It actually gave me that Scarface feeling. This might give of the wrong impression, I haven't seen them sinse. Is the blu-ray worth the cash?
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista Netherlands Show Events Funny Funny x 1 (list)

  8. Post #8
    TheJoker's Avatar
    July 2008
    3,607 Posts
    I never saw the first one entirely. Always fell asleep like a hour in.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Informative Informative x 2Agree Agree x 1Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  9. Post #9
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    As a child I could only get into the second one, it has alot of action and a quicker pace. It actually gave me that Scarface feeling. This might give of the wrong impression, I haven't seen them sinse. Is the blu-ray worth the cash?
    Please... Scarface is the polar opposite of Godfather 2.
    Look:

    as compared to:


    But yeah, worth getting a HD version of them.

    Edited:

    I never saw the first one entirely. Always fell asleep like a hour in.
    Try.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Agree Agree x 2 (list)

  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    broodroos's Avatar
    July 2005
    183 Posts
    I know, I know. I WAS YOUNG. Will give it another watch soon and THEN correct my statement.

  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    Speaking of which I watched Scarface only last week. Hilarious as always. :>
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Funny Funny x 1 (list)

  12. Post #12
    NEAT GUY
    TheFilmSlacker's Avatar
    January 2011
    18,732 Posts
    I was never a fan of these movies. I could never put my finger on why, really. I love mob movies, but The Godfather never appealed to me.

    Goodfellas on the other hand...

  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    I was never a fan of these movies. I could never put my finger on why, really. I love mob movies, but The Godfather never appealed to me.

    Goodfellas on the other hand...
    It's a lot more focused on characters and long sequences rather than quick events.

    Most of Goodfellas takes place over the course of 20 years where as the Godfather movies take advantage of time.

    For example, the scene in Goodfellas where    Billy Batts is killed   , the conversation between Robert De Niro and that guy would go on and on so you get a true sense of what each person is like.

    We never really know what De Niro is like in the movie. Weirdly, the only character who we know about the most is Karen (Lorraine Bracco).

  14. Post #14
    NEAT GUY
    TheFilmSlacker's Avatar
    January 2011
    18,732 Posts
    It's a lot more focused on characters and long sequences rather than quick events.

    Most of Goodfellas takes place over the course of 20 years where as the Godfather movies take advantage of time.

    For example, the scene in Goodfellas where    Billy Batts is killed   , the conversation between Robert De Niro and that guy would go on and on so you get a true sense of what each person is like.

    We never really know what De Niro is like in the movie. Weirdly, the only character who we know about the most is Karen (Lorraine Bracco).
    Yeah, I agree in that sense. De Niro didn't get enough screen time and he's in the middle of the fucking poster.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 Canada Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  15. Post #15
    This is -- excuse me -- a DAMN fine cup of coffee.
    The_Marine's Avatar
    August 2008
    8,795 Posts
    Great films except for Part 3.

  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    Great films except for Part 3.
    The only thing worth mentioning when Part 3 is talked about is Pacino's performance. Really great.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Agree Agree x 2 (list)

  17. Post #17
    This is -- excuse me -- a DAMN fine cup of coffee.
    The_Marine's Avatar
    August 2008
    8,795 Posts
    Seriously, it's probably the most unnecessary sequel ever.
    Virtually nothing of value was learned in it and the only thing it managed to do was muss up the story from the last two films.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP United States Show Events Agree Agree x 3 (list)

  18. Post #18
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    Part 2 was pretty much 2 movies in one so in essence we already have our trilogy.

  19. Post #19
    Joz
    Joz's Avatar
    September 2009
    2,252 Posts
    Actually, Part 3 wasn't that bad, really. Fucking Sofia Coppola ruined it totally. If only we could see version from Cracked... sigh.

  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    Actually, Part 3 wasn't that bad, really. Fucking Sofia Coppola ruined it totally. If only we could see version from Cracked... sigh.
    In all fairness, she was 19 at the time. And I don't particularly think she had much of an impact as a character, she was just there to be there.
    If you watch it just for Michael Corleone's character, then it's actually a very good movie.

  21. Post #21
    Pops's Avatar
    November 2009
    6,697 Posts
    You put the love theme but not The Godfather Waltz? :rage:


  22. Post #22
    TheIceman's Avatar
    September 2009
    4,392 Posts
    I got the restoration trilogy on DVD.

    It's so beautiful...

  23. Post #23
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    You put the love theme but not The Godfather Waltz? :rage:

    I prefer the love theme to be how I remember Godfather for some reason. I think it was the reason I watched it actually. I watched a trailor when I was about 13 and it had that music so I had to watch it. :)

  24. Post #24
    Gold Member
    dirty harry's Avatar
    December 2006
    2,783 Posts
       Sonny's death scene is one of my favourite death scenes.   

    Also, favourite scene from the entire trilogy is probably in Part II when    Michael confronts Fredo, the "You're nothing to me." part   .
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United Kingdom Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  25. Post #25
    Gold Member
    pie_is_good's Avatar
    January 2008
    8,271 Posts
    my favourite character in the series is this chick
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP Canada Show Events Funny Funny x 5Friendly Friendly x 1 (list)

  26. Post #26
    Gold Member
    Matte's Avatar
    July 2009
    424 Posts
    The Godfather series is one of the best movie series I've ever watched. Especially the first movie. I love Marlon Brando's acting, he just gives every scene that little extra touch. I also love the character Vito Corleone. He's by far the most interesting character in my opinion. I just love the time before    Mike becomes the Don   . I would like to know even more about Vito's past.

    Also, the scenes in Sicily are just beautiful. Probably my favorite parts in the whole series.

  27. Post #27
    I'M A MASSIVE FAGGOT AND LOVE COCKS
    DrBreen's Avatar
    June 2007
    4,991 Posts
    You guys going to hate me for this but..


    First 50 seconds

    i feel like a terrible person though
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 Portugal Show Events Funny Funny x 2 (list)

  28. Post #28
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    I would like to know even more about Vito's past.
    I think Robert De Niro did an inexplicably awesome job of doing Young Vito's character.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United Kingdom Show Events Agree Agree x 3 (list)

  29. Post #29
    Gold Member
    cecilbdemodded's Avatar
    January 2005
    6,421 Posts
    The way things ended between Michael and Fredo is why the third movie was unnecessary. The theme had already played out by the end of the second movie. The third movie contributes what? Using corrupt methods to protect what's dear to you actually destroys everything in the end? Yeah, that's what the second movie was about.

  30. Post #30
    Gold Member
    pie_is_good's Avatar
    January 2008
    8,271 Posts
    ``The Godfather'' is told entirely within a closed world. That's why we sympathize with characters who are essentially evil. The story by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola is a brilliant conjuring act, inviting us to consider the Mafia entirely on its own terms. Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando) emerges as a sympathetic and even admirable character; during the entire film, this lifelong professional criminal does nothing of which we can really disapprove.

    During the movie we see not a single actual civilian victim of organized crime. No women trapped into prostitution. No lives wrecked by gambling. No victims of theft, fraud or protection rackets. The only police officer with a significant speaking role is corrupt.

    The story views the Mafia from the inside. That is its secret, its charm, its spell; in a way, it has shaped the public perception of the Mafia ever since. The real world is replaced by an authoritarian patriarchy where power and justice flow from the Godfather, and the only villains are traitors. There is one commandment, spoken by Michael (Al Pacino): ``Don't ever take sides against the family.''

    It is significant that the first shot is inside a dark, shuttered room. It is the wedding day of Vito Corleone's daughter, and on such a day a Sicilian must grant any reasonable request. A man has come to ask for punishment for his daughter's rapist. Don Vito asks why he did not come to him immediately.

    ``I went to the police, like a good American,'' the man says. The Godfather's reply will underpin the entire movie: ``Why did you go to the police? Why didn't you come to me first? What have I ever done to make you treat me so disrespectfully? If you'd come to me in friendship, then this scum that ruined your daughter would be suffering this very day. And if, by chance, an honest man like yourself should make enemies . . . then they would become my enemies. And then they would fear you.''

    As the day continues, there are two more scenes in the Godfather's darkened study, intercut with scenes from the wedding outside. By the end of the wedding sequence, most of the main characters will have been introduced, and we will know essential things about their personalities. It is a virtuoso stretch of filmmaking: Coppola brings his large cast onstage so artfully that we are drawn at once into the Godfather's world.

    The screenplay of ``The Godfather'' follows no formulas except for the classic structure in which power passes between the generations. The writing is subtly constructed to set up events later in the film. Notice how the request by Johnny Fontane, the failing singer, pays off in the Hollywood scenes; how his tears set up the shocking moment when a mogul wakes up in bed with what is left of his racehorse. Notice how the undertaker is told ``someday, and that day may never come, I will ask a favor of you. . .'' and how when the day comes the favor is not violence (as in a conventional movie) but Don Vito's desire to spare his wife the sight of their son's maimed body. And notice how a woman's ``mistaken'' phone call sets up the trap in which Sonny (James Caan) is murdered: It's done so neatly that you have to think back through the events to figure it out.

    Now here is a trivia question: What is the name of Vito's wife? She exists in the movie as an insignificant shadow, a plump Sicilian grandmother who poses with her husband in wedding pictures but plays no role in the events that take place in his study. There is little room for women in ``The Godfather.'' Sonny uses and discards them, and ignores his wife. Connie (Talia Shire), the Don's daughter, is so disregarded that her husband is not allowed into the family business. He is thrown a bone--``a living''--and later, when he is killed, Michael coldly lies to his sister about what happened.

    The irony of the title is that it eventually comes to refer to the son, not the father. As the film opens Michael is not part of the family business, and plans to marry a WASP, Kay Adams (Diane Keaton). His turning point comes when he saves his father's life by moving his hospital bed, and whispers to the unconscious man: ``I'm with you now.''

    After he shoots the corrupt cop, Michael hides in Sicily, where he falls in love with and marries Appolonia (Simonetta Stefanelli). They do not speak the same language; small handicap for a Mafia wife. He undoubtedly loves Appolonia, as he loved Kay, but what is he thinking here: that he can no longer marry Kay because he has chosen a Mafia life? After Appolonia's death and his return to America, he seeks out Kay and eventually they marry. Did he tell her about Appolonia? Such details are unimportant to the story.

    What is important is loyalty to the family. Much is said in the movie about trusting a man's word, but honesty is nothing compared to loyalty. Michael doesn't even trust Tom Hagen (Robert Duvall) with the secret that he plans to murder the heads of the other families. The famous ``baptism massacre'' is tough, virtuoso filmmaking: The baptism provides him with an airtight alibi, and he becomes a godfather in both senses at the same time.

    Vito Corleone is the moral center of the film. He is old, wise and opposed to dealing in drugs. He understands that society is not alarmed by ``liquor, gambling . . . even women.'' But drugs are a dirty business to Don Vito, and one of the movie's best scenes is the Mafia summit at which he argues his point. The implication is that in the godfather's world there would be no drugs, only ``victimless crimes,'' and justice would be dispatched evenly and swiftly.

    My argument is taking this form because I want to point out how cleverly Coppola structures his film to create sympathy for his heroes. The Mafia is not a benevolent and protective organization, and the Corleone family is only marginally better than the others. Yet when the old man falls dead among his tomato plants, we feel that a giant has passed.

    Gordon Willis' cinematography is celebrated for its darkness; it is rich, atmospheric, expressive. You cannot appreciate this on television because the picture is artificially brightened. Coppola populates his dark interior spaces with remarkable faces. The front-line actors--Brando, Pacino, Caan, Duvall--are attractive in one way or another, but those who play their associates are chosen for their fleshy, thickly lined faces--for huge jaws and deeply set eyes. Look at Abe Vigoda as Tessio, the fearsome enforcer. The first time we see him, he's dancing with a child at the wedding, her satin pumps balanced on his shoes. The sun shines that day, but never again: He is developed as a hulking presence who implies the possibility of violent revenge. Only at the end is he brightly lit again, to make him look vulnerable as he begs for his life.

    The Brando performance is justly famous and often imitated. We know all about his puffy cheeks, and his use of props like the kitten in the opening scene. Those are actor's devices. Brando uses them but does not depend on them: He embodies the character so convincingly that at the end, when he warns his son two or three times that ``the man who comes to you to set up a meeting--that's the traitor,'' we are not thinking of acting at all. We are thinking that the Don is growing old and repeating himself, but we are also thinking that he is probably absolutely right.

    Pacino plays Michael close to his vest; he has learned from his father never to talk in front of outsiders, never to trust anyone unnecessarily, to take advice but keep his own counsel. All of the other roles are so successfully filled that a strange thing happened as I watched this restored 1997 version: Familiar as I am with Robert Duvall, when he first appeared on the screen I found myself thinking, ``There's Tom Hagen.''

    Coppola went to Italy to find Nino Rota, composer of many Fellini films, to score the picture. Hearing the sadness and nostalgia of the movie's main theme, I realized what the music was telling us: Things would have turned out better if we had only listened to the Godfather.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP Canada Show Events Winner Winner x 3 (list)

  31. Post #31
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    That was beautiful.

    Going off-topic here, but I watched "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse". It's a documentary about Apocalypse Now. Seriously... words can't describe how insane it is that the movie got made. We have actors and artists who make a movie about war. That's fair enough, but it's not simply about what happened, it simply is the insanity that occurred within that world.

    The movie managed to be made despite: Martin Sheen's heart attack, Typhoon destroying sets, no ending being written in stone.

    What is great about Francis Ford, is that he just likes flow. Although some may say it makes the movie DRAG on, into the depths of this movie world... I think it's amazing.

    There's nothing like immersive movie making.

  32. Post #32
    Gold Member
    -ZeeBo-'s Avatar
    March 2005
    1,900 Posts
    I have been meaning for a long time to watch The Godfather trilogy but I haven't found a great opportunity yet, I feel that this movie must be watched in the right mood. This isn't any movie you can watch one evening when you come home from the job, right?

  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    I have been meaning for a long time to watch The Godfather trilogy but I haven't found a great opportunity yet, I feel that this movie must be watched in the right mood. This isn't any movie you can watch one evening when you come home from the job, right?
    It's more a weekend movie.

  34. Post #34
    Gold Member
    pie_is_good's Avatar
    January 2008
    8,271 Posts
    Well I watched it on a Thursday and it was still a great movie.



    You don't have to act like you have to do some big preparation for the movie or anything. Just be attentive while watching.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP Canada Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  35. Post #35
    Gold Member
    AK'z's Avatar
    January 2011
    29,694 Posts
    The first one is incredibly easy to watch as compared to the second. The second one is a big movie.