1. Post #1
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    This jeep has been in the family for some time now but no one can recelect when the fluids were changed (besides oil). Not sure what to do here, don't have enough money for a new jeep or anything. Coming here because my dad and brother are plenty knowledgeable, but are growing tired of hearing about it.

  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    Disco_Potato's Avatar
    January 2012
    736 Posts
    Replace the fluid in the transmission and differential(s).
    While youre at it you probably need to replace the spark plugs, spark plug wires, fuel filter, flush the radiator out and replace the coolant, and replace the air filter.

    All of this you can probably do yourself if you have a small mechanical inclination and some basic tools. Id suggest getting a Haynes manual.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 4 (list)

  3. Post #3
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    I've got good skills. Sounds easy enough.

    Edited:

    Replace the fluid in the transmission and differential(s).
    While youre at it you probably need to replace the spark plugs, spark plug wires, fuel filter, flush the radiator out and replace the coolant, and replace the air filter.

    All of this you can probably do yourself if you have a small mechanical inclination and some basic tools. Id suggest getting a Haynes manual.
    What about the whole trans fluid doing more bad than good?

  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    NuclearAnnhilation's Avatar
    June 2009
    7,007 Posts
    You don't need to go the full nine yards like what disco said, its a Cherokee just change the oil and check everything else. Just because its old doesn't mean it NEEDS to be changed. Doing a full checkout would be good but not necessary. If it still runs and was run recently, there shouldn't be an issue.

  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    Disco_Potato's Avatar
    January 2012
    736 Posts
    Dude, it has 230k miles on it and it sounds like it has had very little maintenance.
    Thats not going "all out", thats just basic maintenance that probably should have been done 20 times since the last time it was done.

    There are sooo many more things that probably need to be done, I was just listing a few basics related to the engine/drivetrain.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 4Disagree Disagree x 1 (list)

  6. Post #6
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    Dude, it has 230k miles on it and it sounds like it has had very little maintenance.
    Thats not going "all out", thats just basic maintenance that probably should have been done 20 times since the last time it was done.

    There are sooo many more things that probably need to be done, I was just listing a few basics related to the engine/drivetrain.
    I agree, that's not going "all out" but, don't get me wrong, this thing was cared for as in, not beaten, fixed when needed and such. It was my Dad's daily driver, 100 highway round trip each day for a few years. But it never really registered that this thing would be around this long, because it was a temporary type of thing, and he knew he was going to need a new vehicle sooner or later. But i'm the type of guy who instead of buying brand new crap, i'd rather make due with what i've got. I'm just worried that things will start to go wrong if i change the trans/diff fluid, since it hasn't been done in a long time.

  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    Disco_Potato's Avatar
    January 2012
    736 Posts
    I know how it is, Im not passing judgement.
    My family had a CRV with over 200k on it that probably had average oil change intervals of ~20k miles, and still had stock spark plugs, wires, timing belt, etc.

    But doing those simple things can make a huge difference. I cant tell you how many times Ive had people ask for help with their car because it would barely run and I fixed it by just replacing the plug wires or something else simple like that.

  8. Post #8
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Mhm, routine maintenance is how my F150 got to 300,000 miles.



    Check the tranny fluid on the dipstick very thoroughly. Smell it and feel it as well as just looking at it. If it feels slightly gritty and doesn't smell badly burnt do not change it. It means the transmission is in a precarious position where the only thing holding it together is debris floating in the tranny fluid. It's typical of automatics that get neglected, they still work fine until you flush 'em, then the grit in the fluid that was keeping it working is gone and it just falls apart. On top of that, Chrysler automatics of that vintage were iffy at best. So honestly, unless the tranny fluid smells like it's burnt, leave the gearbox alone and continue to not beat on it.


    230,000 miles is a damn long life regardless. You've gotten more life out of that gearbox than most people would reasonably expect the whole car to live.


    On the diff fluid? Go right ahead. change that out. The diff will only thank you. Unlike the tranny, it doesn't rely on the friction between clutch packs and their respective gear housings to function, so the grit floating around in that oil is of no use. Drain, flush and refill them.

    But i'm the type of guy who instead of buying brand new crap, i'd rather make due with what i've got.


    I'm one of them as well. I have an '85 F150 with 300,000 miles. Would I trade it for a newer one? Fuck to the hell no, my current one still has a good life left in it and I intend to drive it until it simply won't drive anymore.




    and then I'll probably rebuild it and drive it some more.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Friendly Friendly x 1Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  9. Post #9
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    Mhm, routine maintenance is how my F150 got to 300,000 miles.



    Check the tranny fluid on the dipstick very thoroughly. Smell it and feel it as well as just looking at it. If it feels slightly gritty and doesn't smell badly burnt do not change it. It means the transmission is in a precarious position where the only thing holding it together is debris floating in the tranny fluid. It's typical of automatics that get neglected, they still work fine until you flush 'em, then the grit in the fluid that was keeping it working is gone and it just falls apart. On top of that, Chrysler automatics of that vintage were iffy at best. So honestly, unless the tranny fluid smells like it's burnt, leave the gearbox alone and continue to not beat on it.


    230,000 miles is a damn long life regardless. You've gotten more life out of that gearbox than most people would reasonably expect the whole car to live.


    On the diff fluid? Go right ahead. change that out. The diff will only thank you. Unlike the tranny, it doesn't rely on the friction between clutch packs and their respective gear housings to function, so the grit floating around in that oil is of no use. Drain, flush and refill them.





    I'm one of them as well. I have an '85 F150 with 300,000 miles. Would I trade it for a newer one? Fuck to the hell no, my current one still has a good life left in it and I intend to drive it until it simply won't drive anymore.




    and then I'll probably rebuild it and drive it some more.
    I checked the fluid, no grit. But.. I'm not sure what burnt tranny fluid smells like.. Lol would it be easily distinguished?

  10. Post #10
    IT WAS ONLY $1 SO WHY NOT BUY A TITLE?
    Tukimoshi's Avatar
    March 2007
    3,102 Posts
    I agree, that's not going "all out" but, don't get me wrong, this thing was cared for as in, not beaten, fixed when needed and such. It was my Dad's daily driver, 100 highway round trip each day for a few years. But it never really registered that this thing would be around this long, because it was a temporary type of thing, and he knew he was going to need a new vehicle sooner or later. But i'm the type of guy who instead of buying brand new crap, i'd rather make due with what i've got. I'm just worried that things will start to go wrong if i change the trans/diff fluid, since it hasn't been done in a long time.
    As long as you do it properly, it's unlikely you'll make anything worse by changing fluids. Worst case, find a friend who knows how to do this stuff and get his help. At the least, change the oil and check the other fluids if possible. I've never suffered it but my mom killed a car by not changing the oil often enough. It only happens if you really don't do it often but you should still do it.

  11. Post #11
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    As long as you do it properly, it's unlikely you'll make anything worse by changing fluids. Worst case, find a friend who knows how to do this stuff and get his help. At the least, change the oil and check the other fluids if possible. I've never suffered it but my mom killed a car by not changing the oil often enough. It only happens if you really don't do it often but you should still do it.
    I'm not very novice or naive, oil changes 3k miles, and general fluids are checked weekly. I've just read so much about transmission just taking a deuce when fluid gets changed on high mileage.

  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    I checked the fluid, no grit.
    Then you should be able to change it. Make sure to get the right stuff, Chryslers require special ATF unique to them and many require a friction modifier. It's all in the owner's manual.

    But.. I'm not sure what burnt tranny fluid smells like.. Lol would it be easily distinguished?
    You'd know if it was burnt. It's a very distinctive smell and not one that one's likely to second-guess.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Winner Winner x 1 (list)

  13. Post #13
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    Then you should be able to change it. Make sure to get the right stuff, Chryslers require special ATF unique to them and many require a friction modifier. It's all in the owner's manual.


    You'd know if it was burnt. It's a very distinctive smell and not one that one's likely to second-guess.
    Thanks for all your help, if i have any more questions, hopefully you'll see my thread. Also, good luck with your F-150, i'm not a fan of newer Fords, so keep that one alive.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Thanks for all your help, if i have any more questions, hopefully you'll see my thread.
    Heh, ok. No prob.


    Also, good luck with your F-150, i'm not a fan of newer Fords, so keep that one alive.
    I'm not either. That's why mine is 26 years old. I fully expect to still be driving it when the time comes to stop using gasoline because it's just prohibitively expensive. Thankfully the engine's so simple I can convert it to run on alcohol for a grand total of $750 or so.

  15. Post #15
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    You better change the brake fluid, if it hasn't been changed for a few years it could contain some water or air
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Mac Belgium Show Events Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,012 Posts
    ^^^ That's actually true. Brake fluid flushes are a good idea if you've got some money to burn and want to take the utmost care of the vehicle. Despite being a sealed system it gets dirty and could benefit from occasional replacement.

    That being said.... if this Jeep hasn't had the bleeders cracked open ever (probably not unless it popped a line or needed a new caliper), they're almost 100% assuredly not going to budge anymore. So it's a moot point.. just run the fluid you have now until a line rusts enough to crack open, then run a few quarts through the system while doing the bleeding process.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  17. Post #17
    Gold Member
    NuclearAnnhilation's Avatar
    June 2009
    7,007 Posts
    Well the one thing no ones asked so far is when was it last ran? Is it daily driven or what?

  18. Post #18
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    You better change the brake fluid, if it hasn't been changed for a few years it could contain some water or air

    If the pedal isn't spongy there's nothing to worry about.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  19. Post #19
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    If the pedal isn't spongy there's nothing to worry about.


    Most brands prescribe a brake fluid change every few years because it really gets dirty. The person who rated dumb doesn't work on cars himself? It really can make a big difference if u change it. Btw, not everybody knows how a brake should feel, not everyone knows alot about cars.

  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,490 Posts
    The person who rated dumb doesn't work on cars himself?
    ...I own an auto shop. >_>

  21. Post #21
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Most brands prescribe a brake fluid change every few years because it really gets dirty.
    And much like an automatic the dirt can be all that's keeping the system working. My F150 had horribly filthy brake fluid, it was so dark you literally couldn't see half an inch into it, and I drove it just fine on that fluid. Pedal felt fine, stopped fine, never acted up at all, brakes were stone cold reliable.


    Then I replaced the right front brake caliper, which saw a large chunk of that old, dirty fluid getting flushed out whether I wanted it to be or not. Reason that got changed: The piston tweaked itself in the bore and jammed on, causing that brake to drag. The brake master cylinder didn't even survive the requisite bleeding after I got the new one in before it let go. It would just slowly sink to the floorboards, and if held there, pressure would bleed off until the truck would roll under it's own weight. Definitely would have been unsafe to try to drive it like that, which is why I didn't leave the driveway until I got a new master cylinder in it.


    If the pedal feels fine and it isn't leaking, chances are, it's best not to mess with it.
    It really can make a big difference if u change it.
    Only if the fluid has bubbles in it.
    Btw, not everybody knows how a brake should feel, not everyone knows alot about cars.
    Even the most inept soccer mom to ever buy a Toyota Sequoia can tell when the brake pedal feels spongy. You don't need to be a gearhead to tell when there's air in the brake fluid. You need only be used to how the brakes feel when they're in good shape to tell when they're not in good shape.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Zing Zing x 1Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  22. Post #22
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    Well the one thing no ones asked so far is when was it last ran? Is it daily driven or what?
    The jeep is daily driven. Was for years, sat a couple. Then I started driving it last Apri, and haven't stopped.

    Edited:

    You better change the brake fluid, if it hasn't been changed for a few years it could contain some water or air
    I probably could have saved a lot of arguing here, but I haven't been on. The brakes have been blead etc. not all that long ago. We did most maintinence when it was needed, but my dad never did too many precautionary measures.

    We're no r-tards, we own a dyno service for small engines, and have two smaller dirt track race cars. I could list the amount of things that give my family the proper credentials, but it's pretty lengthy and unnecessary. The only reason I post here, is because I like to get opinions from people other than my brothers and dad who don't give too much of a crap for my jeep issues.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply United States Show Events Friendly Friendly x 1 (list)

  23. Post #23
    Gold Member
    NuclearAnnhilation's Avatar
    June 2009
    7,007 Posts
    Well if it's daily driven by you for months, and nothing's wrong, what's your point then?

    Edited:

    I have a 95 Cherokee and was never taken care of and I've had it for almost two years

  24. Post #24
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    And much like an automatic the dirt can be all that's keeping the system working. My F150 had horribly filthy brake fluid, it was so dark you literally couldn't see half an inch into it, and I drove it just fine on that fluid. Pedal felt fine, stopped fine, never acted up at all, brakes were stone cold reliable.


    Then I replaced the right front brake caliper, which saw a large chunk of that old, dirty fluid getting flushed out whether I wanted it to be or not. Reason that got changed: The piston tweaked itself in the bore and jammed on, causing that brake to drag. The brake master cylinder didn't even survive the requisite bleeding after I got the new one in before it let go. It would just slowly sink to the floorboards, and if held there, pressure would bleed off until the truck would roll under it's own weight. Definitely would have been unsafe to try to drive it like that, which is why I didn't leave the driveway until I got a new master cylinder in it.


    If the pedal feels fine and it isn't leaking, chances are, it's best not to mess with it. Only if the fluid has bubbles in it.
    Even the most inept soccer mom to ever buy a Toyota Sequoia can tell when the brake pedal feels spongy. You don't need to be a gearhead to tell when there's air in the brake fluid. You need only be used to how the brakes feel when they're in good shape to tell when they're not in good shape.
    The problem is that the fluid loses it's important components what could change it's boiling point as example (also because there's getting water in it), which lowers it's performance when you brake alot, which could lead to accidents (and yes it happens) In my opinion braking is important, and i want my braking system to be in the best shape possible. What you do with it is your case, i'm just saying.
    Also, when you have a more modern car with abs, bad fluid could fuck up your ABS system, we did some abs block changes because they malfunctioned from old brake fluid.
    Yes it isn't very cheap, but it's better to spend money on stuff like that, than on big rims and shiny exhausts.

  25. Post #25
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    The problem is that the fluid loses it's important components what could change it's boiling point as example (also because there's getting water in it), which lowers it's performance when you brake alot, which could lead to accidents (and yes it happens) In my opinion braking is important, and i want my braking system to be in the best shape possible. What you do with it is your case, i'm just saying.
    Also, when you have a more modern car with abs, bad fluid could fuck up your ABS system, we did some abs block changes because they malfunctioned from old brake fluid.
    Yes it isn't very cheap, but it's better to spend money on stuff like that, than on big rims and shiny exhausts.

    Whatever was floating in my brake fluid didn't change the boiling point on me. The dragging brake got hot enough to get the heavy iron rotor, and by heavy I mean 15 pounds for one rotor heavy, glowing red hot at one point, smoke rolling over the right front fender and onto the hood, and it never boiled the fluid. If it was going to do so it would have then.


    I don't take chances with my brakes either. That's why I don't open them up unless I have to.

  26. Post #26
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    Whatever was floating in my brake fluid didn't change the boiling point on me. The dragging brake got hot enough to get the heavy iron rotor, and by heavy I mean 15 pounds for one rotor heavy, glowing red hot at one point, smoke rolling over the right front fender and onto the hood, and it never boiled the fluid. If it was going to do so it would have then.


    I don't take chances with my brakes either. That's why I don't open them up unless I have to.
    Yes but i'm more specific about fluid warming up because of getting under pressure constantly when braking, that makes it very hot in the whole system, and not only at the rotor. Also i'm sure it doesn't lead to things braking or malfunctioning in all cases but as i said, it does happen.

  27. Post #27
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Yes but i'm more specific about fluid warming up because of getting under pressure constantly when braking, that makes it very hot in the whole system, and not only at the rotor. Also i'm sure it doesn't lead to things braking or malfunctioning in all cases but as i said, it does happen.
    I'm not doubting that water in the brake fluid is bad news, I'm just trying to point out that a system that isn't opened up generally doesn't get water in it in the first place. My brake fluid was due for a flush when Bush Sr took office, yet I didn't have to replace it until my master cylinder conked out just six months ago.


    A glowing hot rotor is going to seriously accelerate fluid boiling, though. Especially with the metal calipers used on my front brakes that act as big-ass heat sinks. Honestly I'm surprised the fluid didn't boil. By all accounts it should have, even without water contamination, as it simply wasn't specified to deal with the heat in the right front brake AND it was several years and over a hundred thousand miles past due for a change. I also lucked out on the rotor, it didn't warp, although I did crack the brake pad linings slightly.

  28. Post #28
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    Well if it's daily driven by you for months, and nothing's wrong, what's your point then?

    Edited:

    I have a 95 Cherokee and was never taken care of and I've had it for almost two years
    I want to treat my Jeep as well as i can instead of neglecting it, i know they're very reliable, but it's still not in the best of tastes to not take precautionary measures.

  29. Post #29
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    I'm not doubting that water in the brake fluid is bad news, I'm just trying to point out that a system that isn't opened up generally doesn't get water in it in the first place. My brake fluid was due for a flush when Bush Sr took office, yet I didn't have to replace it until my master cylinder conked out just six months ago.


    A glowing hot rotor is going to seriously accelerate fluid boiling, though. Especially with the metal calipers used on my front brakes that act as big-ass heat sinks. Honestly I'm surprised the fluid didn't boil. By all accounts it should have, even without water contamination, as it simply wasn't specified to deal with the heat in the right front brake AND it was several years and over a hundred thousand miles past due for a change. I also lucked out on the rotor, it didn't warp, although I did crack the brake pad linings slightly.

    Yes. It. Does. Every brake system gets water in it, you can search it on google if you dont believe me. Every year a certain percentage of water gets into the brake system. i'm talking bout 5% in a couple of years, but it makes the difference. And believe me, the fluid gets much hotter when you, by example, drive up and down mountains, where you have to take big use of braking, and the fluid gets under big pressure. The pressure makes the fluid very hot, and you will really feel the difference after a while in how much worse the brakes work when you went down a few hills. So if there's water in the system, the point at where the brakes start to work less good, will be much sooner. YOu know what, i'll google it just to have some real numbers about it, because i can't say for sure myself:

    Most automotive professionals agree that glycol-based brake fluid, (DOT 3, DOT 4, DOT 5.1) should be flushed, or changed, every 1–2 years.[2] Many manufacturers also require periodic fluid changes to ensure reliability and safety. Once installed, moisture diffuses into the fluid through brake hoses and rubber seals and, eventually, the fluid will have to be replaced when the water content becomes too high.
    Many experts have long recommend changing the brake fluid every year or two for preventative maintenance. Their rationale is based on the fact that glycol-based brake fluid starts to absorb moisture from the moment it is put in the system. The fluid attracts moisture through microscopic pores in rubber hoses, past seals and exposure to the air. The problem is obviously worse in wet climates where humidity is high.

    After only a year of service, the brake fluid in the average vehicle may contain as much as two percent water. After 18 months, the level of contamination can be as high as three percent. And after several years of service, it is not unusual to find brake fluid that contains as much as seven to eight percent water.
    An NHTSA survey found that the brake fluid in 20% of 1,720 vehicles sampled contained 5% or more water!

    As the concentration of moisture increases, it causes a sharp drop in the fluid's boiling temperature. Brand new DOT 3 brake fluid must have a dry (no moisture) boiling point of at least 401 degrees F, and a wet (moisture-saturated) boiling point of no less than 284 degrees. Most new DOT 3 fluids exceed these requirements and have a dry boiling point that ranges from 460 degrees up to over 500 degrees.

    Only one percent water in the fluid can lower the boiling point of a typical DOT 3 fluid to 369 degrees. Two percent water can push the boiling point down to around 320 degrees, and three percent will take it all the way down to 293 degrees, which is getting dangerously close to the minimum DOT and OEM requirements.

    DOT 4 fluid, which has a higher minimum boiling temperature requirement (446 degrees F dry and 311 degrees wet) soaks up moisture at a slower rate but suffers an even sharper drop in boiling temperature as moisture accumulates. Three percent water will lower the boiling point as much as 50%!

    Considering the fact that today's front-wheel drive brake systems with semi-metallic linings run significantly hotter than their rear-wheel drive counterparts, high brake temperatures require fluid that can take the heat. But as we said earlier, the brake fluid in many of today's vehicles cannot because it is old and full of moisture.

    Water contamination increases the danger of brake failure because vapor pockets can form if the fluid gets too hot. Vapor displaces fluid and is compressible, so when the brakes are applied the pedal may go all the way to the floor without applying the brakes!
    Anything else?
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Mac Belgium Show Events Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  30. Post #30
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    An NHTSA survey found that the brake fluid in 20% of 1,720 vehicles sampled contained 5% or more water!

    Oh, look, a bullshit survey of a pathetically small fraction of the cars. Seriously, they expect 1720 cars to be representative of the entire nation's fleet?! I could survey 1720 vehicles in the woods around me and come up with some bullshit figure like "64% of all vehicles on American roadways have severe body rust". That wouldn't be any more valid than the survey you quoted.

    Brake fluid does not magically accumulate water unless you let the water in somehow. Leaks in the system, allowing rainwater to enter the master cylinder when checking brake fluid levels, driving through deep water, that's how you get water contaminated brake fluid. The pores in the rubber hoses are not going to let a significant amount of water in unless those hoses are already due for replacement, and 99% of the vehicles in the world never see conditions that allow an amount of water into the fluid to render it unsafe to drive.

    Many experts have long recommend changing the brake fluid every year or two for preventative maintenance. Their rationale is based on the fact that glycol-based brake fluid starts to absorb moisture from the moment it is put in the system. The fluid attracts moisture through microscopic pores in rubber hoses, past seals and exposure to the air. The problem is obviously worse in wet climates where humidity is high.

    After only a year of service, the brake fluid in the average vehicle may contain as much as two percent water. After 18 months, the level of contamination can be as high as three percent. And after several years of service, it is not unusual to find brake fluid that contains as much as seven to eight percent water.

    This sounds like fearmongering to me. NOBODY has the fluid flushed that often. It's an expensive and unnecessary service, and usually isn't even in the owner's manual list of routine maintenance. Hell, brake fluid often doesn't get flushed out until a major component gets replaced. Go to any used lot in America and you'll find ten, fifteen, even twenty year old cars still sporting the same brake fluid they shipped from the factory with, and they're all perfectly safe to drive and in no danger of the brakes boiling.

    It sounds to me like it's the same 'experts' that claim 3,000 miles or 3 months is a good oil change interval today. It isn't, and hasn't been for ten or fifteen years now.



    Now stop spazzing out. Water in the brake fluid is nowhere near as frequent as you seem to think it is.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  31. Post #31
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,012 Posts
    Well the old guys with extra retirement money who get it done yearly would beg to differ :P

    Had one guy.. always wanted a yearly change of like every fluid in his older Cadillac Deville. Some old fellas just don't know what else to spend their money on I think lol.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows XP United States Show Events Funny Funny x 1 (list)

  32. Post #32

    November 2010
    510 Posts
    Dude, it has 230k miles on it and it sounds like it has had very little maintenance.
    Thats not going "all out", thats just basic maintenance that probably should have been done 20 times since the last time it was done.

    There are sooo many more things that probably need to be done, I was just listing a few basics related to the engine/drivetrain.
    If your car is over 200,000 miles on the factory transmission, draining the fluid can literally destroy it. It's not a good idea.

    Nevermind was beaten to it

  33. Post #33
    Bettler's Avatar
    July 2010
    132 Posts
    If your car is over 200,000 miles on the factory transmission, draining the fluid can literally destroy it. It's not a good idea.

    Nevermind was beaten to it
    Even if it doesn't have grit and isn't burnt?

  34. Post #34
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Even if it doesn't have grit and isn't burnt?


    If it's not gritty and not burnt there's no danger of the tranny not working after a change. Any tranny that is susceptible to failing after a fluid change will have grit in the fluid, that grit is what's keeping it working, and since yours does not it should be fine.

  35. Post #35
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    Talking to a wall i guess. Well, make your own opinion over it, on modern cars it's very common to change the fluid every 4-6 years, that's where i live, and i can go and ask in any garage over here. May be different in america since you don't have to get yearly check ups that have to be done to keep your car allowed to run on public roads.

  36. Post #36
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,511 Posts
    Talking to a wall i guess. Well, make your own opinion over it, on modern cars it's very common to change the fluid every 4-6 years, that's where i live, and i can go and ask in any garage over here. May be different in america since you don't have to get yearly check ups that have to be done to keep your car allowed to run on public roads.

    As long as the lights work and the wheels stay attached it more or less doesn't matter, no. Also, you just doubled back on yourself, couple posts ago you said every one year, now you're saying 4-6.


    Methinks it's just customary in your area to do excessive maintenance. We tend to adopt the "If it ain't broke don't fix it" adage.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows Vista United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  37. Post #37
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    As long as the lights work and the wheels stay attached it more or less doesn't matter, no. Also, you just doubled back on yourself, couple posts ago you said every one year, now you're saying 4-6.


    Methinks it's just customary in your area to do excessive maintenance. We tend to adopt the "If it ain't broke don't fix it" adage.
    I said every year a certain percentage of water gets in the system, i didn't say to change it every year. Every brand gives a different amount of time to change it.

  38. Post #38
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,012 Posts
    If your car is over 200,000 miles on the factory transmission, draining the fluid can literally destroy it. It's not a good idea.

    Nevermind was beaten to it
    Not totally correct.
    If you have 100,000+ on trans fluid a FLUSH is a very bad idea because it can agitate clutch material that has found its way into corners and stuff where it sits, not causing issues... but once it gets stirred up by 100% new fluid w/ it's lifting and cleaning agents it can block valves and cause loss of gears.

    However, dropping the pan and replacing the filter/ some of the trans fluid is just fine, generally no matter what mileage trans fluid has on it. Haven't ran into issues caused from a pan drop trans service.

    Also, check the caliper slide bolts on the front.. IIRC the threads on the holes for them like to strip out on these.. or maybe it's a different year.. but I think it's this gen. I've seen a couple come through with slides fallen out, or very near.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Windows 7 United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  39. Post #39

    November 2010
    510 Posts
    Not totally correct.
    If you have 100,000+ on trans fluid a FLUSH is a very bad idea because it can agitate clutch material that has found its way into corners and stuff where it sits, not causing issues... but once it gets stirred up by 100% new fluid w/ it's lifting and cleaning agents it can block valves and cause loss of gears.


    However, dropping the pan and replacing the filter/ some of the trans fluid is just fine, generally no matter what mileage trans fluid has on it. Haven't ran into issues caused from a pan drop trans service.

    Also, check the caliper slide bolts on the front.. IIRC the threads on the holes for them like to strip out on these.. or maybe it's a different year.. but I think it's this gen. I've seen a couple come through with slides fallen out, or very near.
    You're right, I ended up doing more research on this topic after posting out of curiosity.