1. Post #1
    Siminov's Bitch
    EvilSkydiver's Avatar
    April 2011
    1,425 Posts
    Hello everyone,

    I happen to have a friend who is willing to sell me his 1984 Volkswagen Scirocco for $500. Here's the kicker, his clutch is going out and needs to be replaced. Other than that the car is in pretty good shape no heavy rust on the body or engine trouble. The only thing is I don't know how hard it would be to replace a clutch, I have access to a full garage and tools but I have never gone this far on any car that I have owned. The main question I have is, is it a good buy?
    ;p

    P.S. I'll be posting more information on it mileage and other info when I go out to see the car tomorrow.

  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    For 500 anything that still runs is a good buy. That's all I spent on my F150, and I've put 100,000 miles on it since buying it without issue. Scrap value for most cars is about $350-$450 so it's not like you're out a fortune if it turns out a dud.


    Changing the clutch will be a bit of a faff due to the FWD nature of the car but it is DIY doable. Remember to get a FULL clutch kit(You should receive disc, pressure plate, alignment tool, throwout bearing, pilot bushing/bearing), replace the pilot bushing/bearing, have the flywheel ground, and if it needs it pop a rear main in as well. And remember to retorque everything correctly. You'll also need the Haynes manual on that year Scirocco, it will step-by-step you through the process and list all torque specs.

    Something to note: Older stuff tends to be easier to work on. I did the clutch in my F150 in about five hours or so worth of work. It took two weeks on the calendar because of having to have the flywheel ground and locating a friend to help heave the gearbox back in, but the total time spent with tools in hand wasn't long at all. A FWD car will be a bit more cramped, look to spend about a day's worth with tools in hand and to sit idle for about three or four days while the parts joint machines the flywheel for you. I also highly suggest getting a friend to help install and remove the transmission, those things are deceptively heavy.
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  3. Post #3
    Facepunch Babysitter
    BANNED USER's Avatar
    July 2009
    12,424 Posts
    As long as you can find the clutch for it then yes, because working ones from what I've seen usually go for around 1,200 to 4,200 for a decent one.
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  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    zotic's Avatar
    November 2005
    2,684 Posts
    DO IT

    Wait you're in the states?

  5. Post #5
    Siminov's Bitch
    EvilSkydiver's Avatar
    April 2011
    1,425 Posts
    DO IT

    Wait you're in the states?
    ah ya... no
    I'm in the Army and I live on a US base in Germany.

  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    zotic's Avatar
    November 2005
    2,684 Posts
    Then do it, VW parts are cheap as shit here in the EU
    The scirocco is an easy car to work with all in all :)
    From my experience that is, (i've had a Golf mk2, and now a Corrado G60)

  7. Post #7
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    seems ok, but clutch prices could run high in a car that old.. has it been driving with a bad clutch for a long time? You have to be carefull that when you replace the clutch it doesn't break the flywheel/connection to crankshaft, because of the higher torque of a new friction plate. Happened in our workshop once on a old alfa romeo, it broke the flywheel
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  8. Post #8
    VAG Lover
    DPKiller's Avatar
    June 2010
    2,934 Posts
    I would buy it in a hart beat. And if you ever come back to the US BRING IT WITH YOU!!!

  9. Post #9
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,460 Posts
    Everything TestTickle said is truth.

    If said garage has a 2post lift then you're set. A few hours and it'll be loose and you can lower it down with a tranny jack piece of cake.

    If it doesn't have a lift, it'll be a lot less fun. FWD cars suck to drop the trans when it's just on jack stands, in my opinion anyway. Do-able? For sure, just have some buddies around for removal and re-installation who can help muscle it into place.

  10. Post #10
    Siminov's Bitch
    EvilSkydiver's Avatar
    April 2011
    1,425 Posts
    Everything TestTickle said is truth.

    If said garage has a 2post lift then you're set. A few hours and it'll be loose and you can lower it down with a tranny jack piece of cake.

    If it doesn't have a lift, it'll be a lot less fun. FWD cars suck to drop the trans when it's just on jack stands, in my opinion anyway. Do-able? For sure, just have some buddies around for removal and re-installation who can help muscle it into place.
    Thanks, our base has a garage with lifts, fully stocked with tools, the only thing is I need help finding a guide or a video of taking it apart.

  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    It's simple, just like a Golf or Jetta.

    http://www.vintagewatercooleds.com/t...tch/clutch.htm

  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    The Jackal's Avatar
    July 2006
    274 Posts
    But its a 16v and awesome
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  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    seems ok, but clutch prices could run high in a car that old.. has it been driving with a bad clutch for a long time? You have to be carefull that when you replace the clutch it doesn't break the flywheel/connection to crankshaft, because of the higher torque of a new friction plate. Happened in our workshop once on a old alfa romeo, it broke the flywheel
    That should never happen. Part of a standard clutch replacement involves machining the flywheel, and in doing so you inspect it for cracks. If it's cracked, it will go pop on you, discard it and fit a new one.
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  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    clutch2's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,460 Posts
    Thanks, our base has a garage with lifts, fully stocked with tools, the only thing is I need help finding a guide or a video of taking it apart.
    That video would be so long!

    Basically you do this:

    1.Remove any and all the BS that looks like it may be in the way.. battery, airbox, etc.
    2. Remove shift cables and clutch line or cable.. usually the starter, too.
    3. Remove CV axles, and cradle if necessary.
    4. Remove mount/s, support trans with trans jack.
    5. Remove bellhousing bolts
    6. Remove trans
    7. Replace clutch/ machine or replace flywheel.. reassemble with proper torquespecs and loctite
    8. Reverse removal instructions..
    9. Bleed clutch hydraulic system if necessary and if it's not a cable clutch
    10. Fill trans with fluid if you lost any.

    Same basic steps for any car, really. Work smart and if something doesn't want to go there's a good chance there's a missed bolt or something that requires locating still.

  15. Post #15
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    That should never happen. Part of a standard clutch replacement involves machining the flywheel, and in doing so you inspect it for cracks. If it's cracked, it will go pop on you, discard it and fit a new one.

    It looked ok, the problem was the bolts that connect the flywheel with the crankshaft weren't good anymore, but it wasn't noticeable, and the owner wanted a cheap fix. The torque made the bolts crack in the flywheel.. our garage is specialized and known for oldtimers, so i think my boss knows what he's doing.. we replace gearboxes and friction plates all the time, it's the first time this happened.

  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    It looked ok, the problem was the bolts that connect the flywheel with the crankshaft weren't good anymore, but it wasn't noticeable, and the owner wanted a cheap fix. The torque made the bolts crack in the flywheel.. our garage is specialized and known for oldtimers, so i think my boss knows what he's doing.. we replace gearboxes and friction plates all the time, it's the first time this happened.
    How cheap a fix did they want if they couldn't afford five bucks for a set of grade 10s to stick in there when the flywheel was reinstalled?

  17. Post #17
    Siminov's Bitch
    EvilSkydiver's Avatar
    April 2011
    1,425 Posts
    Well good news everyone,

    I bought it. Thank you everyone for all your help, the next big step will be to replace the clutch. Now can finally use that spare key to a Volkswagen Scirocco...

    ...family guy hehe ;p

  18. Post #18
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    How cheap a fix did they want if they couldn't afford five bucks for a set of grade 10s to stick in there when the flywheel was reinstalled?
    It wasn't only about the bolts, the guy said he just wanted the friction plate and check for any other problems when noticeable. There weren't any, so we didn't fix it..Now it's back in the garage and everything has to be changed because he wanted to be cheap. We always listen to clients now since there is still a case running in court from a guy who got an engine swap in our garage for his VW beetle, which was obviously fine-tuned for the best performance, since he wanted sport camshafts and al that shit, and now he is complaining that he didn't ask for any fine tuning and he doesn't want to pay his bill.. which runs into a couple of thousands of euros with all the work and parts included.
    Long story short: lots of people with an oldtimer don't really have the money to maintain it :)

  19. Post #19
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    It wasn't only about the bolts, the guy said he just wanted the friction plate and check for any other problems when noticeable. There weren't any, so we didn't fix it..Now it's back in the garage and everything has to be changed because he wanted to be cheap. We always listen to clients now since there is still a case running in court from a guy who got an engine swap in our garage for his VW beetle, which was obviously fine-tuned for the best performance, since he wanted sport camshafts and al that shit, and now he is complaining that he didn't ask for any fine tuning and he doesn't want to pay his bill.. which runs into a couple of thousands of euros with all the work and parts included.
    Long story short: lots of people with an oldtimer don't really have the money to maintain it :)

    That case should be an easy one to win for you guys. I assume over there they have the same paperwork they do here, and if someone tried that here they'd be shown the contract they signed authorizing the shop to do the tuning before a single wrench got turned. They'd then be ordered to pay the bill, fined for wasting the court's time, and that'd be that.

  20. Post #20
    Droelsj's Avatar
    July 2011
    88 Posts
    That case should be an easy one to win for you guys. I assume over there they have the same paperwork they do here, and if someone tried that here they'd be shown the contract they signed authorizing the shop to do the tuning before a single wrench got turned. They'd then be ordered to pay the bill, fined for wasting the court's time, and that'd be that.
    Yep he lost the case 2 times, but he keeps taking it back to court. It's been going on for 2 years now, but i think it's the last time he can take it to court, if he loses now, it will cost him lots of money.
    It's just a drag to be dealing with this for such a long time, that i understand that my boss just wants his money right away instead of waiting for it for 2 years and going to court :)

  21. Post #21
    Siminov's Bitch
    EvilSkydiver's Avatar
    April 2011
    1,425 Posts
    Also does anyone happen to know if I need to do any special mods to the car to bring it into the U.S.

  22. Post #22
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    I think the Scirocco had different bumpers here... Nothing else I can think of. Might be exempt from inspection or something because of age though. I forget what the import laws are.

  23. Post #23
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    1984? It'd only be exempt if he put antique tags on it, and that would cap it at driving to and from car shows and on weekends. He couldn't use it as a daily.


    I think all he'd have to do is fit a catalytic converter on it and he'd be able to drive it around just fine.

  24. Post #24
    Gold Member
    Del91's Avatar
    October 2010
    10,329 Posts
    My truck is an 88 and after this year It'll be exempt here in Washington.
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  25. Post #25
    Gold Member
    bradley's Avatar
    January 2011
    5,493 Posts
    1984? It'd only be exempt if he put antique tags on it, and that would cap it at driving to and from car shows and on weekends. He couldn't use it as a daily.


    I think all he'd have to do is fit a catalytic converter on it and he'd be able to drive it around just fine.
    Depends on the area. Vehicle laws are not universal in the States, not even speed limits are. All motor vehicle laws are governed by state.

  26. Post #26
    MasterDragon
    Siminov's Avatar
    May 2009
    6,649 Posts
    1984? It'd only be exempt if he put antique tags on it, and that would cap it at driving to and from car shows and on weekends. He couldn't use it as a daily.


    I think all he'd have to do is fit a catalytic converter on it and he'd be able to drive it around just fine.
    I know Freeman IRL and where he lives, they don't require cats on cars older than 1996.

  27. Post #27
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    7,026 Posts
    I know Freeman IRL and where he lives, they don't require cats on cars older than 1996.

    Where I am you have to have a cat on anything that originally shipped with a cat. By '84 everything did, so if he were to register it here he'd have to fit one.


    I'd do it anyway just out of courtesy to the guy behind, as not everyone on the road likes the smell of half-burnt gasoline.
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  28. Post #28
    Concur's Avatar
    December 2011
    1,964 Posts
    I wish the dmv site wasnt so goddamned hard to find shit on, im sure a cat delete would be illegal but i really dont give a fuck, regardless its coming off the comanche.

  29. Post #29
    Gold Member
    Del91's Avatar
    October 2010
    10,329 Posts
    My truck is an 88 and after this year It'll be exempt here in Washington.
    Because trees.