1. Post #1
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    I have gotten a second handed eMachine D260 series laptop. Unfortunately, the BIOS is password protected, and the previous user was dumb enough not to remove it, nor set CD-ROM as the primary boot device.

    At the moment, I cannot install windows on this laptop if I do not remove this password.

    The laptop uses PhoenixBIOS.

    Any tips?

    ---
    Also, I tried to let the computer boot from the CD rom by removing the hard drive, and plugging it back in afterward, the installation program cannot find my hard drive in this case.

  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    Yumyumbublegum's Avatar
    January 2009
    7,714 Posts
    Move the Motherboard jumper over two pins then start the computer, if you don't have the jumper. Turn of the computer, remove the CMOS battery for a couple minutes then put it back in.

  3. Post #3
    Gold Member
    Benjy355's Avatar
    January 2006
    264 Posts
    Hold ESC or F10, or something along those lines. There should be a shortcut to select the boot device.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Canada Show Events Bad Reading Bad Reading x 2Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  4. Post #4
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    @Yumyumbublegum, This is a laptop, there are no jumpers, and accessing the CMOS battery is very difficult

    @Benjy355, there is, but it doesn't show up for whatever reason

  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    YodaEXE's Avatar
    December 2005
    1,473 Posts
    @Yumyumbublegum, This is a laptop, there are no jumpers, and accessing the CMOS battery is very difficult

    @Benjy355, there is, but it doesn't show up for whatever reason
    You're going to have to do it. That's how you clear the password. Time to rip apart the system.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    benjgvps's Avatar
    June 2008
    6,515 Posts
    I couldn't find any info, so you may have to take (Usually) the bottom off and remove the coin battery. If you can't turn on the computer to be used, you won't really loose too much if you somehow break it.

  7. Post #7
    kill yourself
    Protocol7's Avatar
    June 2006
    25,725 Posts
    You can try certain key combinations. For example, on certain HP laptops, if you take out the battery and hold power for 5-10 seconds, it factory resets. There may be an eMachines equivalent (hell, that may be the same in the eMachines laptop.) Also try key combos like hold down Esc and then press Power.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply United States Show Events Agree Agree x 1 (list)

  8. Post #8
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    Taking out the battery didn't work, and neither did any key combination worked

  9. Post #9
    Red3000's Avatar
    November 2009
    222 Posts
    Boot it without the cmos battery.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Canada Show Events Bad Reading Bad Reading x 2Dumb Dumb x 1 (list)

  10. Post #10
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    This laptop wouldn't even turn on if the CMOS battery is absent

    Edited:

    I've read that there's a program named "!BIOS" that can help me. Google however, does not like the exclamation mark. Does anyone know where to find this?

  11. Post #11
    adzicents's Avatar
    November 2008
    843 Posts

  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    Dr Nick's Avatar
    November 2007
    3,903 Posts
    http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000235.htm

    Likely under the keyboard or inside an openable compartment on the bottom.

    Both are easy areas to check.

  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    Fijgum's Avatar
    September 2005
    1,670 Posts
    That reminded me of a friend's netbook.

    He entered a password longer than it was supposed to be but the system didn't stop him from entering more than allowed. So he could only enter the first few letters from the whole password.
    Problem was you couldn't bypass it so he had to send it in and he got a new netbook :|

  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    benjgvps's Avatar
    June 2008
    6,515 Posts
    That reminded me of a friend's netbook.

    He entered a password longer than it was supposed to be but the system didn't stop him from entering more than allowed. So he could only enter the first few letters from the whole password.
    Problem was you couldn't bypass it so he had to send it in and he got a new netbook :|
    I saw something like that, apparently you just type the first few letters in and it should boot. I read that on the Acer Aspire One forums.
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Reply Canada Show Events Informative Informative x 1 (list)

  15. Post #15
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    The previous owner of the laptop don't even remember it at all, so that wouldn't be a resolution

    I tried to externally dump the EEPROM where the CMOS is stored using a custom build I2C bus sniffer and soldered SDA and SCL pins to my reader, turned out that the content of the EEPROM doesn't have anything that I can understand :/

    Also, tools like !Bios, CmosPwd and etc didn't work

  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    M2k3's Avatar
    February 2005
    2,095 Posts
    How long did you leave it when you took the CMOS battery out?

  17. Post #17
    [EG] Pepper's Avatar
    August 2009
    9,280 Posts
    flashing it may do the trick

    you may already know this but if something goes wrong in flashing the BIOS do not DO NOT turn the PC off

  18. Post #18
    compwhiziitothemax's Avatar
    May 2009
    1,276 Posts
    flashing it may do the trick

    you may already know this but if something goes wrong in flashing the BIOS do not DO NOT turn the PC off
    I'm pretty sure you need the pass to do a bios flash.

  19. Post #19
    B1N4RY!'s Avatar
    September 2009
    15,255 Posts
    How long did you leave it when you took the CMOS battery out?
    24 hours, just in case if there are capacitors that are acting as "backup power supply" to the CMOS.

    Edited:

    I'm pretty sure you need the pass to do a bios flash.
    Not necessarily, as there are windows based programs that can gain direct low level access to the LPC flash.
    However, the guy who previous owned this laptop was tard enough to enable "virus protection", which basically disabled bios flashing inside of an GUI based OS such as Windows as long as it is enabled; which I cannot because the bios is password locked!

  20. Post #20
    [EG] Pepper's Avatar
    August 2009
    9,280 Posts
    bugger that then

    the motherboards i flashed didnt need passwords

    (asrock am2nf3_vsta, gigabyte 7vkmp, asrock p4i65g, asus p5vd2-vm)

    Edited:

    ninja'd