1. Post #1
    President Obama's Avatar
    March 2010
    12 Posts
    Article; Health Care posted:
    Stage set for historic health care reform vote

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    [LIST][*]Former President Clinton urges House Democrats to support health reform bill[*]President Obama makes final appeal for health care: "Let get this done"[*]Republicans say plan will lead to higher premiums and taxes for middle-class families[*]Democrats need 216 votes to pass the bill[/LIST]

    Washington (CNN) -- Former President Bill Clinton made several phone calls Saturday to lobby wavering Democrats to sign on to the health care reform bill, Democratic sources told CNN.
    Clinton made phone calls to an unspecified number of House Democrats on Saturday as leaders tried to round up the 216 necessary votes to pass the bill.
    According to CNN's latest count, 33 House Democrats plan to vote against the legislation. Thirty-eight Democratic "no" votes are needed to kill the bill.
    On Saturday, President Obama made his last appeal for the reform, telling House Democrats on the eve of the historic vote: "Let's get this done."
    "If you agree that the system is not working for ordinary families, if you've heard the same stories that I've heard everywhere, all across the country, then help us fix the system," Obama said.
    "Don't do it for me. Don't do it for Nancy Pelosi or Harry Reid," he said. "Do it for all those people out there who are struggling."
    Obama's speech came just hours after Democratic leaders decided to abandon a controversial legislative mechanism to avoid a direct vote on the health care legislation. They will now hold an up-or-down vote on the $875 billion reform plan that the Senate has already passed.
    iReport: Share your views on health care reform
    Multiple Democratic sources told CNN that Democratic leaders have decided to drop the tactic, known as "deem and pass." The proposed tactic had come under fierce criticism.
    The sources said the House will have three votes Sunday -- a vote on the terms of debate, a vote on compromise changes to the Senate bill, and then finally, a vote on the Senate bill itself.
    "We have been debating health care for decades," Obama said. "It has now been debated for a year. It is in your hands. It is time to pass health care for Americans and I am confident that you are going to do it tomorrow."
    If the Senate bill passes the House, Obama will sign it into law. If the package of changes is passed, it will be taken up by the Senate.
    Freshmen House Republicans rallied Saturday against the bill.
    "The health care decision should be made between a patient, their family and their physician," said Rep. Phil Roe of Tennessee. "Not the insurance company, not the federal government. And this is a great intrusion by the federal government in that decision-making process."
    Administration officials claim that the reform plan has been picking up momentum in recent days. They told CNN they had a "really good day" Thursday, when the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that the compromise plan would cost $940 billion over 10 years while reducing the deficit by $138 billion -- $20 billion more than the bill passed by the Senate. The budget office numbers reassured some fiscally conservative Democrats, according to congressional leaders.
    "Not only does it reduce the deficit, we pay for it responsibly in ways that the other side of the aisle -- that talks about fiscal responsibility but doesn't seem to be able to walk the walk -- can't claim when it comes to their prescription drug bill," Obama said Saturday in a jab at Republicans.
    House Minority Leader John A. Boehner countered the president: "Democratic leaders are telling their members after this passes, it's going to become much more popular. Well, they're dead wrong."
    "This is not the way to go, and the American people know it."
    If enacted, the measure would constitute the biggest expansion of federal health care guarantees since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid over four decades ago. It would extend insurance coverage to an additional 32 million Americans, according to a preliminary analysis from the budget office.
    Republicans contend the plan amounts to a government takeover of the private insurance system that will do little to slow spiraling medical costs.
    Obama addressed those concerns Saturday, insisting there is "no government takeover."
    "We are making sure that the system of private insurance works for ordinary families," he said, calling the legislation a "patient's bill of rights on steroids" and "the toughest insurance reform in history."
    Republicans argue it would lead to higher premiums and taxes for middle-class families while resulting in deep Medicare cuts.
    Among other things, the plan would expand Medicare prescription drug coverage, increase federal subsidies to help people buy insurance, and ban denials of coverage for pre-existing conditions.
    It seeks to bridge the gap between previous House and Senate bills partly by watering down and delaying the implementation of a tax on high-end insurance plans.
    Republicans are fuming over the Democrats' decision to use a legislative maneuver called reconciliation, which will allow the compromise measures -- if passed by the House -- to clear the Senate with a simple majority of 51 votes.
    Senate Democrats lost their filibuster-proof 60-seat supermajority in January with the election of Republican Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts.
    Republicans contend that reconciliation, which is limited to provisions pertaining to the budget, was never meant to facilitate passage of a sweeping reform measure such as the health care bill. Democrats point out that reconciliation was used to pass several major bills in recent years, including George W. Bush's 2001 and 2003 tax cuts.
    House Democrats have expressed concern that the compromise measures will not be approved by the more conservative Senate. Pelosi said Friday, however, that "when our members go to vote, they will have all the assurances they need" that the Senate will approve the compromise plan.

    http://cnn.com/video/?/video/politic...ealth.care.cnn


    This article and video was by courtesy of CNN

    ------



    • 32,000,000 -- that’s the number of Americans who will get health insurance under my plan. [Source: Congressional Budget Office]

    • That’s also a little more than the populations of Ohio, Virginia, Kentucky and Arizona --- COMBINED. [Source: U.S. Census Bureau]



    ----








    We must act now and put American families and small businesses, not health insurance companies, in control of their own health care.


    We are closer than ever to historic health insurance reform – reform that will extend coverage to more than 30 million Americans, provide security and stability to those who have health insurance, and shift power from insurance companies to consumers.



    The proposal will make health care more affordable, make health insurers more accountable, expand health coverage to all Americans, and make the health system sustainable, stabilizing family budgets, the Federal budget, and the economy:


    • It makes insurance more affordable by providing the largest middle class tax cut for health care in history, reducing premium costs for tens of millions of families and small business owners who are priced out of coverage today. This helps over 32 million Americans afford health care who do not get it today – and makes coverage more affordable for many more. Under the plan, 95% of Americans will be insured.


    • It sets up a new competitive health insurance market giving tens of millions of Americans the same choices of insurance that members of Congress will have.

    • It brings greater accountability to health care by laying out commonsense rules of the road to keep premiums down and prevent insurance industry abuses and denial of care.


    • It will end discrimination against Americans with pre-existing conditions.


    • It puts our budget and economy on a more stable path by reducing the deficit by more than $100 billion over the next ten years – and more than $1 trillion over the second decade – by cutting government overspending and reining in waste, fraud and abuse.







    Both the House and Senate versions of health insurance reform rest upon the following building blocks:


    • Insurance reforms to protect consumers from insurance company worst-practices – like denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions, capping total coverage, and dropping or watering down coverage when you get sick and need it most


    • Consumer protections that will restrict how much of your premium dollars insurance companies can spend on marketing, profits, and salaries


    • Creation of a health exchange to increase consumer choice and guarantee coverage


    • Affordable health options, with subsidies for working families and a hardship waiver

    • Tax credits to help small businesses afford coverage

    • Making preventive care completely free – with no co-payments or deductibles
    • Lowering the cost of health care for our seniors

    • Improving the quality and extending the life of Medicare

    • Ensuring that reform is not only fully paid for, but actually significantly reduces the federal deficit



    In the end, it doesn't matter if you’re republican or democrat, it matters in what you believe in.


    Dennis Kucinich for example: After months of saying he was against the health care bill, U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Cleveland announced last week that he will vote yes.




    Pickup up the phone and phone your local Representative and tell them you want this bill passed and you want them to vote for it, right now.



    Thank you for making it possible,

    President Barack Obama
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  2. Post #2
    Destroyertf's Avatar
    May 2009
    802 Posts
    Progress!

    In before idiots saying: "Omg the governament is going to control my health insurance omg".
    You arent forced to have governament healthcare, you can still have your crappy insurance companies.
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  3. Post #3
    Super Member
    SuperLoz's Avatar
    January 2010
    2,389 Posts
    :D Go America, go!

    Why dumb? :(
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  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    markg06's Avatar
    September 2006
    10,893 Posts
    Progress!

    In before idiots saying: "Omg the governament is going to control my health insurance omg".
    You arent forced to have governament healthcare, you can still have your crappy insurance companies.
    But governmental healthcare is SOCIALIST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How can America cope with something like that!
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  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    Gunar's Avatar
    May 2005
    911 Posts
    But governmental healthcare is SOCIALIST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How can America cope with something like that!
    Do it already you silly fascist bigots.
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  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    markg06's Avatar
    September 2006
    10,893 Posts
    Do it already you silly fascist bigots.
    But we already have the NHS in the UK
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  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    Boba_Fett's Avatar
    August 2007
    9,091 Posts
    It's going to pass, whether I like it or not.
    Might as well try and live with it.

  8. Post #8
    Gold Member
    Murkrow's Avatar
    April 2005
    4,836 Posts
    Don't fuck it up now, guys

  9. Post #9
    Gold Member
    Number-41's Avatar
    August 2005
    4,246 Posts
    Hi guys breaking a leg in Belgium is free :smug:
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  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    gmaster's Avatar
    July 2005
    3,123 Posts
    To be honest, this healthcare thing is retarded. It'll never work. Just like the NHS in Britain doesn't save thousands of lives every d- OH WAIT
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  11. Post #11
    Not a very good Member
    hehe's Avatar
    January 2010
    2,398 Posts
    To be honest, this healthcare thing is retarded. It'll never work. Just like the NHS in Britain doesn't save thousands of lives every d- OH WAIT
    I live in Australia and we have the same system at the Brits, My family and I have saved thousands over the years,

    Its about time the US got the system in place. But unfortunately, a country like the US which is built on super-corporations, this bill is soon going to dissolve into nothing.
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  12. Post #12
    Gold Member
    Leg of Doom's Avatar
    April 2007
    2,735 Posts
    If this does pass will it still costs money to bring the ambulance in America lmfao

  13. Post #13
    Spirit Guide
    Big Dumb American's Avatar
    March 2009
    16,954 Posts
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    If it's not passed, I'll have no chance of getting my surgery paid for. I'd be thrown back into the civilian world as an uninsurable ex-soldier whose primary educational focus cannot be applied due to an inability to get a flight physical approved, with no educational benefits to allow me to pursue an alternate career path. The next several years of my life would be spent working full-time in an entry-level career field in order to raise enough money to pay for a major operation out of pocket.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
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  14. Post #14
    Gold Member

    November 2007
    4,543 Posts
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
    Are you fucking kidding me? I paid your bootcamp with my money, in which you worked your ass off to graduate from, and now they're going to discharge you because of this bullshit?

    Does your condition even affect your UAV piloting or whatever you're in?

  15. Post #15
    Spirit Guide
    Big Dumb American's Avatar
    March 2009
    16,954 Posts
    Are you fucking kidding me? I paid your bootcamp with my taxpayer money, in which you worked your ass off to graduate from, and now they're going to discharge you because of this bullshit?

    Does your condition even affect your UAV piloting or whatever you're in?
    No, not at all. However, we need to have a flight physical to do our jobs. I can't get a flight physical with my pulmonary functions being so severely reduced. The Army has already spent a considerable amount of money training me. And I've invested a considerable amount of time training. The operation I require can cost upwards of twenty thousand dollars. Expensive, yes, but it's only a drop in the bucket compared to what they've spent training me.

    I find it ridiculous that our current military health plan will cover the cost of breast implants and nose jobs, but not career-saving procedures that I, and undoubtedly many others like myself, require to continue serving. This health care bill offers hope that perhaps this can be changed. If it can be voted through.
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  16. Post #16
    Gold Member

    November 2005
    11,757 Posts
    No, not at all. However, we need to have a flight physical to do our jobs. I can't get a flight physical with my pulmonary functions being so severely reduced. The Army has already spent a considerable amount of money training me. And I've invested a considerable amount of time training. The operation I require can cost upwards of twenty thousand dollars. Expensive, yes, but it's only a drop in the bucket compared to what they've spent training me.

    I find it ridiculous that our current military health plan will cover the cost of breast implants and nose jobs, but not career-saving procedures that I, and undoubtedly many others like myself, require to continue serving. This health care bill offers hope that perhaps this can be changed. If it can be voted through.
    Welcome to America.
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  17. Post #17
    Gold Member

    November 2007
    4,543 Posts
    No, not at all. However, we need to have a flight physical to do our jobs. I can't get a flight physical with my pulmonary functions being so severely reduced. The Army has already spent a considerable amount of money training me. And I've invested a considerable amount of time training. The operation I require can cost upwards of twenty thousand dollars. Expensive, yes, but it's only a drop in the bucket compared to what they've spent training me.

    I find it ridiculous that our current military health plan will cover the cost of breast implants and nose jobs, but not career-saving procedures that I, and undoubtedly many others like myself, require to continue serving. This health care bill offers hope that perhaps this can be changed. If it can be voted through.
    Threaten to go to the media.
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  18. Post #18
    Spirit Guide
    Big Dumb American's Avatar
    March 2009
    16,954 Posts
    Threaten to go to the media.
    No sense in that at this point. Their policies are clearly stated for all to see. Threatening to go to the media wouldn't accomplish anything other than smearing everybody associated, including myself. At this point, all I can do is wait to see how this bill fares. With luck, I'll have the legal grounds from which to argue a case soon. If not, I'll have to hope my lawyer can find some. Getting my surgery and continuing my service are my highest priorities. I have no intention of simply allowing them to push me out the door. I will exhaust every possible option.
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  19. Post #19
    I am a moderator.
    Swebonny's Avatar
    August 2006
    12,872 Posts
    If this passes, then I will not see USA as a retarded hole filled with fatties.

    Edited:

    Oh wait, the senate have to vote some shit too right?
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  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    blacksam's Avatar
    July 2007
    2,252 Posts
    Let's go Health Care Bill. For the greater good! Is it wrong to want it to come but not have to pay for it?
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  21. Post #21
    Starpluck? More like StarFUCK!!
    Starpluck's Avatar
    September 2008
    11,146 Posts
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    If it's not passed, I'll have no chance of getting my surgery paid for. I'd be thrown back into the civilian world as an uninsurable ex-soldier whose primary educational focus cannot be applied due to an inability to get a flight physical approved, with no educational benefits to allow me to pursue an alternate career path. The next several years of my life would be spent working full-time in an entry-level career field in order to raise enough money to pay for a major operation out of pocket.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
    Wow, I really hope it passes man.
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  22. Post #22
    PIRATE METAL BASTARD
    Zenpod's Avatar
    October 2009
    7,504 Posts
    But we already have the NHS in the UK

    Bupa is still better though
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  23. Post #23
    Gold Member
    POLOPOZOZO's Avatar
    May 2006
    14,854 Posts
    If this passes, then I will not see USA as a retarded hole filled with fatties.

    Edited:

    Oh wait, the senate have to vote some shit too right?
    Senate already voted on this, this is the reconciliation and I'm pretty sure it goes directly to the president after this.

    Edited:

    Oh excuse me I meant directly to the OP.
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  24. Post #24
    Gold Member

    November 2005
    11,757 Posts
    Bupa is still better though
    Even though you have the same Doctors and treatment.

    Edited:

    No sense in that at this point. Their policies are clearly stated for all to see. Threatening to go to the media wouldn't accomplish anything other than smearing everybody associated, including myself. At this point, all I can do is wait to see how this bill fares. With luck, I'll have the legal grounds from which to argue a case soon. If not, I'll have to hope my lawyer can find some. Getting my surgery and continuing my service are my highest priorities. I have no intention of simply allowing them to push me out the door. I will exhaust every possible option.
    Speak to Lankist, he's a lawyer.
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  25. Post #25
    BAZ
    Dav0r, buy me a custom title. I'm far too poor ;_;
    BAZ's Avatar
    July 2005
    12,582 Posts
    Bupa is still better though
    My mum worked for the NHS and Bupa, and said the quality of care was exactly the same.

  26. Post #26
    Gold Member
    sp00ks's Avatar
    January 2008
    12,044 Posts
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    If it's not passed, I'll have no chance of getting my surgery paid for. I'd be thrown back into the civilian world as an uninsurable ex-soldier whose primary educational focus cannot be applied due to an inability to get a flight physical approved, with no educational benefits to allow me to pursue an alternate career path. The next several years of my life would be spent working full-time in an entry-level career field in order to raise enough money to pay for a major operation out of pocket.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
    It is a completely insane though to most Europeans that you can't just get surgery for things like this.
    America is so uncivilized.
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  27. Post #27
    President Obama's Avatar
    March 2010
    12 Posts
    In these final, crucial days, much more will be asked of us. Our resolve will be tested.

    During moments like this, I believe it's important to remember why we have worked so hard for so long. That's why I spoke to the country Monday at a gathering in Ohio and said it plainly: I'm here for Natoma.

    Natoma Canfield is like most of us: She works hard, and tries to do what's right. Years ago, she had battled back from cancer, so she always maintained health insurance in case she ever really needed it again. But because of her medical history, the insurance company kept raising her deductible and her premiums.

    Last year alone, Natoma paid over $10,000 in monthly premiums and co-pays, while her insurance company chipped in just $900. And then they hiked up her rates another 40%. She simply couldn't afford it -- she had to cancel her policy. That's when she wrote to me. I read her letter, and shared her story with insurance company CEOs as another reason why the system has to change.

    That was two weeks ago. Then, just last week, the unthinkable happened: Natoma collapsed, and was rushed to a hospital. It's leukemia -- the cancer has returned. Now she's in the hospital, worried sick not just about her condition, but how she'll financially survive.

    So why am I still in this fight? Simple. I'm here for Natoma.

    I'm here because of the countless others who have been denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions. I'm here for the small business owners forced to chose between health care and hiring. I'm here for the folks who are forced to watch helplessly as their premiums skyrocket with no reason or recourse.

    And I'm here for my mother. She died of cancer, and in the last six months of her life, I saw her on the phone in her hospital room arguing with insurance companies instead of focusing on getting well and spending time with her family.

    As I was finishing my remarks Monday, a woman in the crowd called out, "we need courage." She's right.

    The politicians in Washington need courage to face down the powerful interests who have held back progress for far too long. And all of us who share this cause need courage to speak up with persistence and clarity in these final days.

    I've always found that courage comes from remembering that we fight for something and someone beyond ourselves. It comes from our faith. And it comes from our commitment to those we love.

    So please take a moment to remember those who inspire you -- those who give you the strength to march on.

    There's very little time left, and still much to do. But I believe to my core in the power of Americans to change history when we put our mind to it. And if you'll stay with us in these final days, I know we can do it again:

    http://my.barackobama.com/speakout


    Thank you for making it possible,

    President Barack Obama
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  28. Post #28
    Gold Member
    smurfy's Avatar
    October 2007
    21,345 Posts
    Universal healthcare? Pfft, that is so last century. Universal broadband is where it's at America, get with the times.
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  29. Post #29
    Kim Il-Sung's Avatar
    July 2009
    226 Posts
    This can only end well
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  30. Post #30
    Gold Member
    Skippy!'s Avatar
    January 2009
    2,043 Posts
    Still not sure how I feel about this. It seems that both options have so many advantages and disadvantages, it's pointless trying to take one side or another (unless you're personally drastically affected by it). I'm a pretty big believer in 'if it's not broken don't fix it.' Our current system works, and I'd really rather not have another trillion dollars added to the national debt for something that probably works only just as well as its alternative.

    I dunno, get mad at me, but I don't think it's worth the effort and resources required.
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  31. Post #31
    Dyson6's Avatar
    July 2008
    936 Posts
    I doubt this will pass when a lot of the democrats aren't even for it.
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  32. Post #32
    FacepunchZen's Avatar
    December 2008
    486 Posts
    I'd rather not be forced to have health care.
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    Canuhearme?'s Avatar
    April 2008
    16,575 Posts
    You know what?

    I hope this passes.

  34. Post #34
    Gold Member
    fsTyle's Avatar
    December 2006
    832 Posts
    Hope no fucking idiots ruin it..America really needs this.

  35. Post #35
    Gold Member
    Canuhearme?'s Avatar
    April 2008
    16,575 Posts
    I've been arguing against this thing blindly for so long, and what a fool I was when I looked back at it.

    Dammit, I wanted this to be put onto the above post I made.
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  36. Post #36
    FacepunchZen's Avatar
    December 2008
    486 Posts
    I've been arguing against this thing blindly for so long, and what a fool I was when I looked back at it.

    Dammit, I wanted this to be put onto the above post I made.
    Well now you can argue blindly for it.

  37. Post #37
    Gold Member
    Canuhearme?'s Avatar
    April 2008
    16,575 Posts
    Well now you can argue blindly for it.

  38. Post #38
    Mexican's Avatar
    July 2009
    5,753 Posts
    Still not sure how I feel about this. It seems that both options have so many advantages and disadvantages, it's pointless trying to take one side or another (unless you're personally drastically affected by it). I'm a pretty big believer in 'if it's not broken don't fix it.' Our current system works, and I'd really rather not have another trillion dollars added to the national debt for something that probably works only just as well as its alternative.

    I dunno, get mad at me, but I don't think it's worth the effort and resources required.
    At least you have some valid concerns. What I hate is the members of the opposition who scream OMG SOCIALISM

    I live in one of those poor Midwest towns so I'm for it but I can't honestly say that I know what people elsewhere must be feeling about it.

  39. Post #39
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    If it's not passed, I'll have no chance of getting my surgery paid for. I'd be thrown back into the civilian world as an uninsurable ex-soldier whose primary educational focus cannot be applied due to an inability to get a flight physical approved, with no educational benefits to allow me to pursue an alternate career path. The next several years of my life would be spent working full-time in an entry-level career field in order to raise enough money to pay for a major operation out of pocket.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
    I really feel for you, even though i can't imagine what you are going through. You have my deepest wishes and i hope that everything works out. Good luck and all that. :glomp:
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  40. Post #40
    Gold Member
    conman420's Avatar
    January 2007
    1,794 Posts
    This is incredibly relevant to my current situation. Recent medical tests have shown that a physical malformation I've had since birth, one which I'd never considered particularly limiting, has severely reduced my lung functions. For the past several months I've been exploiting every possible angle of the current military health plan to try and get my condition surgically corrected. Unfortunately for me, my defect is considered preexisting. Not only has the military refused to operate, they have stripped my flight status away and are now actively trying to discharge me from the Army. If the health care reforms are voted through, it'll give me new ground from which to argue my case from. At the very least, it would offer me a better legal position in which to argue them into give me the operation, thus saving my long-term career as a pilot. In a perfect world, they would not only give me the operation, but allow me to serve the remainder of my enlistment period.

    If it's not passed, I'll have no chance of getting my surgery paid for. I'd be thrown back into the civilian world as an uninsurable ex-soldier whose primary educational focus cannot be applied due to an inability to get a flight physical approved, with no educational benefits to allow me to pursue an alternate career path. The next several years of my life would be spent working full-time in an entry-level career field in order to raise enough money to pay for a major operation out of pocket.

    I am a fucking soldier. There's something seriously wrong with the way things are if my government and employer would rather throw me aside like a broken tool than give me the medical attention I need to continue serving. I've willingly signed over four years of my life to actively serving, with at least an additional four in the National Guard or Army Reserves. Eight years I've promised them. I passed basic training. I graduated my reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, target identification, imagery analysis, and flight training with a cumulative GPA of 96%. I have no disciplinary record and perform all my duties efficiently and without complaint. I am everything they asked of me and more. I work fourteen hours a day, six days a week. I've earned some fucking medical care, don't you think?
    Come chill with Britain.
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